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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Hurt's Battery - McIntosh's Battalion

Artillery Reserve - Hill's Corps

 

—Army of Northern Virginia —

 
McIntosh's Battalion - Hurt's Battery Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 16, 2008
1. McIntosh's Battalion - Hurt's Battery Tablet
Inscription.
Army of Northern Virginia
Hill's Corps Artillery Reserve
McIntosh's Battalion Hurt's Battery
Hardaway Alabama Artillery

Two Whitworths and Two 3 inch Rifles

July 1 The Whitworths were in position near Chambersburg Pike west of Herr's Tavern and actively engaged. The 3 inch Rifles occupied the hill near Fairfield Road west of Willoughby Run but did no firing through sometimes under fire.

July 2 All the guns were in position here and actively engaged under heavy fire of sharpshooters and artillery.

July 3 The 3 inch rifles remained here. The Whitworths were moved to position on Oak Hill. All were actively engaged. The Whitworths were beyond the range of the Union guns whilst their own fire reached all parts of the field.

July 4 Withdrew at evening to Marsh Creek on Fairfield Road.

Losses not reported in detail.
 
Erected 1910 by Gettysburg National Military Park Commission.
 
Location. 39° 49.699′ N, 77° 14.672′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is on West Confederate Avenue, on the right when traveling south. Click for map
Hardaway Alabama Artillery image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 16, 2008
2. Hardaway Alabama Artillery
The tablet, the back of which is seen in the center here, stands just behind a stone wall which runs north to south, roughly parallel to West Confederate Avenue, roughly 10 to 15 yards from the road at this point.
. Located on the Schultz Woods section of Seminary Ridge on Confederate Avenue in Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Wallace's Battery - McIntosh's Battalion (within shouting distance of this marker); McIntosh's Battalion (within shouting distance of this marker); Rice's Battery - McIntosh's Battalion (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Rice's Battery - McIntosh's Battalion (within shouting distance of this marker); Army of Northern Virginia (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Army of Northern Virginia (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named Army of Northern Virginia (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named Army of Northern Virginia (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Hart's Battery at Gettysburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Seminary Ridge - Day Two. A National Park Service virtual
View from the Battery Position image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 16, 2008
3. View from the Battery Position
Looking over the marker toward West Confederate Avenue. Today the view is blocked by several modern buildings. At the time of the war, Hurt's battery had an unobstructed view of Gettysburg and the west side of Cemetery Hill.
tour stop. (Submitted on September 27, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Haraway's Alabama Battery. A history of the battery from a reenacting unit portraying the unit. (Submitted on September 27, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Whitworth Rifle image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, January 13, 2007
4. Whitworth Rifle
Located on Oak Hill, near the Peace Memorial are two examples of the Whitworth Breechloading Rifles as used by Hurt's Battery. Another tablet to the Battery stands at that location. The piece is a 2.75-inch Breechloading Whitworth Rifle. An oddity on the field, as most Civil War cannons were loaded from the muzzle. The breech mechanism used a cross brace to open and reseal the powder chamber after loading. Another oddity, the rifling was in the form of a hexagon. The Whitworth had a range of 10,000 yards, in this field configuration, easily double that of most other guns on the field. It is no mistake that these guns were eventually placed at one of the highest points on the battlefield.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 947 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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