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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Columbus in Franklin County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Camp Chase

 
 
Camp Chase Marker (front) image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 3, 2008
1. Camp Chase Marker (front)
Inscription. (Side A):
Camp Chase was a Civil War camp established in May 1861, on land leased by the U.S. Government. Four miles west of Columbus, the main entrance was on the National Road. Boundaries of the camp were present-day Broad Street (north), Hague Avenue (east), Sullivant Avenue (south), and near Westgate Avenue (west). Named for former Ohio Governor and Lincoln's Secretary of the Treasury Salmon P. Chase, it was a training camp for Ohio soldiers, a parole camp, a muster-out post, and a prisoner-of-war camp. As many as 150,000 Union soldiers and 25,000 Confederate prisoners passed through its gates from 1861-1865. By February 1865, over 9,400 men were held at the prison. More than 2,000 Confederates are buried in the Camp Chase Cemetery.

(Side B):
Four future Presidents passed through Camp Chase, A Johnson, Hayes, Garfield, and McKinley, and Confederates captured during Morgan's Raid in 1863 included Gen. Basil W. Duke. The camp was closed in 1865 and by September 1867 dismantled buildings, usable items, and 450 patients from Tripler Military Hospital (also in Columbus) were transferred to the National Soldier's Home in Dayton. In 1895 former Union soldier William H. Knauss organized the first memorial service at the cemetery and in 1906 wrote a history of the camp. In 1902 the memorial Arch was dedicated.
Camp Chase Marker (back) image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 3, 2008
2. Camp Chase Marker (back)
From 1912 to 1994, the United Daughters of the Confederacy held annual services. The Hilltop Historical Society now sponsors the event on the first Sunday in June.
 
Erected 1999 by Ohio Bicentennial Commission, The Longaberger Company, Hilltop Historical Society, Blue & Gray Magazine, Dixie Chapter UDC, Sons of Confederate Veterans, and The Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 27-25.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection, the Sons of Confederate Veterans/United Confederate Veterans, and the United Daughters of the Confederacy marker series.
 
Location. 39° 56.611′ N, 83° 4.53′ W. Marker is in Columbus, Ohio, in Franklin County. Marker is at the intersection of Sullivant Avenue and Chestershire Road, on the right when traveling west on Sullivant Avenue. Click for map. Cemetery is surrounded by a stone wall with iron fence. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2900 Sullivant Avenue, Columbus OH 43204, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Camp Chase Confederate Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Camp Chase (approx. 0.8 miles away); a different marker also named Camp Chase
Camp Chase Confederate Cemetery Marker at Entrance image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 3, 2008
3. Camp Chase Confederate Cemetery Marker at Entrance
(approx. 0.8 miles away); The National Road (approx. 1.1 miles away); Maynard E. Sensenbrenner (approx. 1.5 miles away); 166th Infantry Regiment (approx. 1.8 miles away); Franklin County Civil War Memorial (approx. 2.1 miles away); Our Unknown Dead (approx. 2.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Columbus.
 
Also see . . .
1. Camp Chase. A brief discussion of the Camp's operation as a training facility and prison. (Submitted on October 5, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Camp Chase Civil War Prison. Additional information and links about Camp Chase. (Submitted on October 5, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Hilltop Historical Society. The Hilltop Historical Society conducts the annual Memorial Service at Camp Chase Cemetery on the 2nd Sunday in June at 3PM. There is a History of Camp Chase link available for more information about Camp Chase. (Submitted on March 3, 2009, by Richard Hoffman of Columbus, Ohio.) 
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil
 
Camp Chase Cemetery Entrance, Looking West image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 3, 2008
4. Camp Chase Cemetery Entrance, Looking West
United Daughters of the Confederacy Marker at Entrance image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 3, 2008
5. United Daughters of the Confederacy Marker at Entrance
Confederate Soldier Monument image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 3, 2008
6. Confederate Soldier Monument
2260 Confederate Soldiers of the War 1861-1865 Buried in this Enclosure
Camp Chase Cemetery, Looking East image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 3, 2008
7. Camp Chase Cemetery, Looking East
Confederate Cannonball Fired at the Battle of Vicksburg, MS, Feb. 3, 1863 image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 3, 2008
8. Confederate Cannonball Fired at the Battle of Vicksburg, MS, Feb. 3, 1863
Donated by Lt. Col. Herbert L. Snapps, U.S. Army Ret.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 2,272 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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