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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Andersonville in Macon County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Providence Spring

 
 
Providence Spring Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 4, 2008
1. Providence Spring Marker
Inscription. During a heavy rainstorm on August 14, 1864, a spring suddenly gushed from this hillside. The prisoners were desperate for fresh water, and over time the event became legendary. Several men claimed to have seen lightning strike this spot just before the spring burst forth.

This damp slope, with its many natural seeps, would appear to be a likely site for a spring. Workmen may have inadvertently buried the spring's outlet while digging the stockade trench. Whether an act of nature or divine providence, the effect of the stream was an answer to thousands of prayers.

"A spring of purest crystal water shot up into the air in a column and, falling in a fanlike spray, went babbling down the grade into the noxious brook. Looking across the dead-line, we beheld with wondering eyes and grateful hearts the fountain spring."
John L. Maile, 8th Michigan Infantry August 15, 1864.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Location. 32° 11.662′ N, 84° 7.808′ W. Marker is in Andersonville, Georgia, in Macon County. Click for map. Located on trail leading to Providence Spring. Marker is in this post office area: Andersonville GA 31711, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker
Providence Spring Building image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 4, 2008
2. Providence Spring Building
. A Tight Stockade (within shouting distance of this marker); World of Lost Spirits (within shouting distance of this marker); Stockade Branch (within shouting distance of this marker); National Woman's Relief Corps Tribute (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Tennessee (about 600 feet away); Ohio (about 600 feet away); Massachusetts (about 700 feet away); Michigan (about 700 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Andersonville.
 
More about this marker. The main photo on the marker shows Former prisoners met at Providence Spring on Decoration Day, 1897. The spring was still vivid in their memories. To the right another photo shows Providence Spring was not exactly at the Pavilion site but on this slope within the deadline. At first prisoners reached the spring by tying cups to tent poles, but guards later allowed them to trough the water into camp.
 
Also see . . .  Andersonville National Historic Site. National Park Service site. (Submitted on October 6, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Providence Spring Fountain image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 4, 2008
3. Providence Spring Fountain
With Charity to All and Malice Toward None.
Providence Spring Ex-POW Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 4, 2008
4. Providence Spring Ex-POW Marker
This fountain erected by the National Association of Union Ex-Prisoners of War in memory of the 52,345 comrades who were confined here as prisoners of war and of the 13,900 comrades buried in the adjoining national cemetery. Dedicated Memorial Day, May Thirtieth Nineteen Hundred and One. James Atwell, National Commander. S. M. Long, Adj't Gen'l. J. D. Walker, Ch'n, Ex. Committee.
Providence Spring Woman's Relief Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 4, 2008
5. Providence Spring Woman's Relief Corps Marker
This pavilion was erected by the Woman's Relief Corps, Auxiliary to the Grand Army of the Republic, in grateful memory of the men who suffered and died in the Confederate prison at Andersonville, Georgia, from February 1864 to April 1865. The prisoner's cry of thirst rang up to heaven. God heard, and with his thunder cleft the earth and poured his sweetest waters gushing here. Erected 1901.
Providence Spring and Stockade Run image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 4, 2008
6. Providence Spring and Stockade Run
Spring pavilion on left and creek on right, behind trees.
Providence Spring image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 8, 2008
7. Providence Spring
Providence Spring Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 8, 2008
8. Providence Spring Marker
Marker in distance (yellow arrow).
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 916 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   7, 8. submitted on , by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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