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Edgefield in Edgefield County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Old Simkins Cemetery

 
 
Old Simkins Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 10, 2008
1. Old Simkins Cemetery Marker
Inscription.
1/2 mile west, on "Ceder Fields" plantation, is buried the family of Captain Arthur Simkins, soldier in the American Revolution and a founder of Edgefield. Born in Virginia on Dec. 10, 1742, he died Sept. 29, 1826. He was a county court judge, a member of the S.C. General Assembly, and was on the commission to divide Ninety-Six District into counties.
 
Erected 1969 by Edgefield County Historic Society and Old 96 Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution. (Marker Number 19-4.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 33° 49.667′ N, 81° 54.283′ W. Marker is in Edgefield, South Carolina, in Edgefield County. Marker is on Center Spring Road. Click for map. Marker is directly across from Simmon Ridge Missionary Baptist Church. Marker is at or near this postal address: 286 Center Spring Road, Edgefield SC 29824, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Village Academy / Furman Academy and Theological Institute (approx. 2.7 miles away); Original Site of Furman Academy (approx. 2.7 miles away); Old Law Building (approx. 2.8
Old Simkins Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 10, 2008
2. Old Simkins Cemetery Marker
miles away); First Baptist Church / Village Cemetery (approx. 2.9 miles away); J. Strom Thurmond Birthplace (approx. 2.9 miles away); Oakley Park Museum (approx. 2.9 miles away); Andrew Pickens (approx. 3 miles away); Piedmont Technical College, Edgefield Center (approx. 3 miles away); Industrial History (approx. 3 miles away); Religion & Education (approx. 3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Edgefield.
 
Also see . . .
1. Cedarfield Plantation – Edgefield – Edgefield County. Original plantation lands were located about three miles north of Edgefield but extended down to present-day Courthouse Square. (Submitted on January 31, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Arthur Simkins. Legislator, born on the eastern shore of Virginia about 1750; died in Edgefield, South Carolina, in 1826. (Submitted on January 31, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. South Carolina Districts, 1800-1814. In 1800, most of the counties were formed into districts: Washington, Pinckney,
Dirt Road Leading to the Old Simkins Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 10, 2008
3. Dirt Road Leading to the Old Simkins Cemetery
The cemetery lies deep into the woods, near a fork in the road. The old plantation house once stood nearby.
Ninety-Six, Camden, and the Cheraws districts vanished, and the counties they had encompassed became districts. (Submitted on February 1, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Recollections of Francis Simkins. Francis Simkins, grandson of Arthur Simkins, recalls his early life in Edgefield and the influence of the Simkins family. (Submitted on January 1, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. About Arthur Simkins
In addition to having the honor of being named the "father of Edgefield", Arthur Simkins was also its first senator in Columbia, serving four consecutive terms from 1790-1806. His son, Eldred, was also a senator from Edgefield (1822-1826) as was his grandson, Arthur (1862-1863). During the Revolutionary War, Simkins sided with the Patriots and his plantation was burned by Tory forces. He was a delegate to the Constitutional Convention and voted against the document, believing that it took too much power from the states. His granddaughter, Eliza Simkins, was the first wife of South Carolina Governor Francis W. Pickens.

From Biographical Sketches of the Bench and Bar of South Carolina by John Belton O'Neall (1859):

"Arthur Simkins was of the most respectable
Old Simkins Cemetery Marker, looking north on Center Spring Road image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2011
4. Old Simkins Cemetery Marker, looking north on Center Spring Road
class from the eastern shore of Virginia, and emigrated early in life to this part of South Carolina. He came first to the region of the Santee, but soon dissatisfied with that locality, pressed onward to the more distant and less frequented forests on the Savannah side of the State. After several years of observation, he ultimately settled a fine body of land on the waters of Log Creek, in Edgefield - a plantation, still remembered by many as 'the Cedar fields.' Here he lived and died. He was County Court Judge under the old system, and was looked up to, as a standard of worth and probity, by all who lived within the sphere of his influence...Sound in principles, and conscientious in politics, he remained a member of the General assembly for many (perhaps twenty) consecutive years, and was universally loved and respected for the simplicity, truthfulness, and sagacity of his life and character. He died, in 1826, leaving a large property. He was a Baptist in his religion, and was seldom missing from his place in the house of God, even in the years of his extreme old age."
    — Submitted January 31, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

2. More About Arthur Simkins
There are few names that shine with a purer and better lustre; and few more deserving of honor by the people
Old Simkins Cemetery Marker, looking south along Center Spring Road image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2011
5. Old Simkins Cemetery Marker, looking south along Center Spring Road
of Edgefield and of the State than that of Simkins.

Arthur Simkins, the father of Eldred [Simkins], was one of the earliest settlers in Edgefield District. He came from the Eastern Shore of Virginia and first went to the region of the Sautee, but becoming dissatisfied in a short time with that region, he went on to the less frequented forest of the Savannah side of the State. After several years of observation he settled on Log Creek. The place he settled was known for a long time, and may be still remembered by some older person as the "Cedar Fields." The writer of this has a feeling that many years ago he heard the place spoken of by that name. It was at the Cedar Fields that Arthur Simkins lived and died. He was County Judge under the old system and was regarded by all who knew him as a man of sterling worth, and as a model of honesty and uprightness.

When the Revolution broke out and the war for Independence began he took the side of Independence, and at an early period of the war the Tories burned his dwelling house, then one of the few large houses in the up-country, besides harrowing and harassing him in every other way incident to a state of civil war.

After the war he was a member of the General Assembly and of the Convention which had been called to consider the adoption of the Constitution of the United States. He voted against the adoption,
Arthur Simkins<br>(1742-1826) image. Click for full size.
Historicedgefield.com, October 22, 2007
6. Arthur Simkins
(1742-1826)
S.C. Senate 1790-1806
Lieutenant Governor of S.C. 1812-1816
S.C. House of Representatives 1817-1821
as did nearly all the delegates from Ninety-Six District. The Act passed by the legislature for calling the Convention to consider the adoption of the Constitution of the United States was very nearly defeated. General Sumter and General Pickens were both opposed to the Constitution on the ground that it took too much power from the State and made the General Government too consolidated. Arthur Simkins agreed with them.

Mr. Simkins remained a member of the General Assembly for many years. He died in 1826, wealthy, honored, and respected, having done his duty as a man and citizen. (Source: History of Edgefield County: From the Earliest Settlements to 1897 by John Abney Chapman (1897), pgs 188-189.)
    — Submitted January 1, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Colonial EraMilitaryNotable PersonsPatriots & PatriotismSettlements & SettlersWar, US Revolutionary
 
Eldred Simkins<br>(1779-1831) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
7. Eldred Simkins
(1779-1831)
Lieutenant Governor of S.C. 1812-1814
U.S. House of Representatives from S.C.
1817-1821
S.C. Senate 1821-1826
S.C. House of Representatives 1828-1829
Simmon Ridge Missionary Baptist Church image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 10, 2008
8. Simmon Ridge Missionary Baptist Church
Church is located across the street from the marker. The African-American church is built on land once part of Cedar Fields Plantation.
Simmon Ridge Missionary Baptist Church -<br>Two Spires and West Gable image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 10, 2008
9. Simmon Ridge Missionary Baptist Church -
Two Spires and West Gable
Simmon Ridge Missionary Baptist<br>Church - North Tower Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 10, 2008
10. Simmon Ridge Missionary Baptist
Church - North Tower Entrance
Many churches in Edgefield feature spires such as this with entrances at the base. Simmon ridge features two spires, each with entrances; other churches feature double entrances on single spires.
Simmon Ridge Missionary Baptist<br>Church Cornerstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 10, 2008
11. Simmon Ridge Missionary Baptist
Church Cornerstone
Simmon Ridge Missionary Baptist Church Sign image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 10, 2008
12. Simmon Ridge Missionary Baptist Church Sign
nearby Simmons Ridge Missionary Baptist Church image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2011
13. nearby Simmons Ridge Missionary Baptist Church
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,731 times since then and 25 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   4, 5. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   6. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   7. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   8. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   9. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   10, 11, 12. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   13. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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