Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Philadelphia in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Artillery Shed

1837

 
 
Artillery Shed Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 11, 2008
1. Artillery Shed Marker
Inscription.
Report from the Fort
30 September 1836 • Richard Delafield, Captain of Engineers

[The] erection of a gun shed, for such artillery and carriages as shall not be mounted in battery … may not … be perfected this fall.
National Archives

A year later, in November 1837 completion of this large-scale shed was reported. It was added to the parade ground during the fort renovation of 1835-39 to hold wheeled ordinance and unmounted cannon. Transport and erection of the monolithic granite pillars that support the timber framing and trusses for the main roof and second floor would have been an engineering challenge. Their strength was calculated to provide the necessary support for storage and winching of heavy cannon. Block and tackle mounted in the center of the structure was the most efficient method for lifting iron cannon to the storage area on the second-floor platform.

Cannon Type . . . . . . . . . . Weight

24 pound . . . . . . . . . .5,500 pounds
32 pound . . . . . . . . . .7,500 pounds
42 pound . . . . . . . . . .8,500 pounds

On the first floor, gun carriages, field artillery, caissons, ammunition wagons, and other wheeled vehicles would have been stored.

After larger and permanent Rodman cannon and rifled guns were mounted in 1865, the Artillery
Marker at Fort Mifflin image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 11, 2008
2. Marker at Fort Mifflin
shed was used for other storage and a carpentry shop. In the 1940s a temporary fourth wall was built to enclose it completely. Restoration to its original function and appearance was carried out by the 365th Engineer Group of the 79th U.S. Army Reserve Command in 1976.

Sidebar: All the cannoneers should be perfectly familiar with all the different kinds of ammunition, their uses and application, and where they are to be found. They should understand … how to spike a gun and how to remove a spike*; how to blow up ammunition chests, and render artillery unserviceable temporarily and permanently. The greater the extent to which the soldier carries this kind of knowledge, in addition to his other duties, the more serviceable will he be, and the greater will be his chances for promotion.

* To spike a cannon meant ramming a metal spike into the vent hole, rendering the gun unusable to the enemy.
Customs of service for non-commissioned officers and soldiers as derived from law and regulations and practiced on the Army of the United States. 1864.
 
Erected by Fort Mifflin Historic Site.
 
Location. 39° 52.503′ N, 75° 12.81′ W. Marker is in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia County. Marker can be reached from W Fort
Fort Mifflin's Artillery Shed image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 11, 2008
3. Fort Mifflin's Artillery Shed
This open shed housed large artillery and carriages for field guns. The pillars that support the second floor can be seen in this photo.
Mifflin Road, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is along the walking tour of Fort Mifflin. Marker is in this post office area: Philadelphia PA 19153, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Blacksmith Shop (here, next to this marker); West Sallyport (a few steps from this marker); Citadel - 1796 (within shouting distance of this marker); Powder Magazine (within shouting distance of this marker); Torpedo Casemate (within shouting distance of this marker); Arsenal (within shouting distance of this marker); Soldiers’ Barracks (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Officers’ Quarters (about 300 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Philadelphia.
 
More about this marker. The marker contains illustrations of an 1852 Ammunition Wagon, a 12-pound gun - model 1841, a 6-pound gun and a mortar wagon.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. This series of markers follow the walking tour of Fort Mifflin.
 
Also see . . .  The Fort that saved America. The Official Website of Fort Mifflin on the Delaware. (Submitted on October 17, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesNotable Buildings
 
Continential Soldiers at the Artillery Shed Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 10, 2013
4. Continential Soldiers at the Artillery Shed Marker
Inside the Artillery Shed image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 11, 2008
5. Inside the Artillery Shed
Cannons, limbers and caissons are stored in the artillery shed at Fort Mifflin.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 912 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   5. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement