Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Bryson City in Swain County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Kituwah

 
 
Kituwah Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, October 19, 2008
1. Kituwah Marker
Inscription. Cherokee mother town. Council house stood on mound here. Town was destroyed in 1776 by Rutherford expedition.
 
Erected 2007 by North Carolina Office Of Archives and History. (Marker Number Q-57.)
 
Location. 35° 26.373′ N, 83° 24.204′ W. Marker is in Bryson City, North Carolina, in Swain County. Marker is on Governors Island Rd (U.S. 19). Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Bryson City NC 28713, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Yonaguska (approx. 0.3 miles away); Cherokee Indian Reservation / (Leaving) Cherokee Reservation (approx. 2.4 miles away); War Dead of Swain County (approx. 2.5 miles away); Tsali (approx. 2.5 miles away); Deep Creek (approx. 2.5 miles away); Ellen Black Winston (approx. 2.7 miles away); Horace Kephart (approx. 2.7 miles away); Thomas's Legion (approx. 4.9 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Bryson City.
 
Also see . . .
1. Kituwah Mound (NC) (Eastern Cherokee). Information and links about Kituwah. (Submitted on October 20, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.) 

2. Kituwah "Mother City". “Kituwa is the site of an ancient earthwork
Kituwah Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, October 19, 2008
2. Kituwah Marker
mound. Despite having been burned repeatedly by the Cherokee for agriculture during the colonial period and plowed over for corn cultivation since Indian Removal in the 1830s, the mound is still visible. During the period of European-American agricultural uses, the larger property was called Fergusonís Field. The mound is 170 feet (52 m) in diameter and five feet tall, although it was once taller. It was the foundation of a structure which housed the sacred flame of the Cherokee, which was to be kept burning at all times.” (Submitted on October 17, 2010, by Tom Gillard of Tullahoma, Tennessee.) 
 
Categories. LandmarksNative Americans
 
Kituwah Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, October 19, 2008
3. Kituwah Marker
Kituwah image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, October 19, 2008
4. Kituwah
Kituwah Aweh image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, October 19, 2008
5. Kituwah Aweh
Mother Town of the Cherokee
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 946 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement