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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Great Smoky Mountains National Park in Swain County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Meathouse

 
 
The Meathouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, October 18, 2008
1. The Meathouse Marker
Inscription. This building protected one of the most valuable commodities on a mountain farm: the meat supply. The most common meat was pork. Without refrigeration, salting and smoking were the most common means of preserving meat and protecting it from insects and bacteria.
Butchering took place in late fall. Cool temperatures were required to keep the meat from spoiling during the initial stages of the preservation process.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Location. 35° 30.766′ N, 83° 18.301′ W. Marker is in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, North Carolina, in Swain County. Marker is on Route 441 half a mile north of Blue Ridge Parkway. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Cherokee NC 28719, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Apple House (a few steps from this marker); Mountain Farm Museum (within shouting distance of this marker); Corn Cribs (within shouting distance of this marker); Sorghum Mill and Furnace (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Blacksmith Shop (about 300 feet away); Civilian Conservation Corps (about
The Meathouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 6, 2012
2. The Meathouse Marker
500 feet away); Mingus Mill (approx. 0.6 miles away); Place of the Poplar Boundary Tree (approx. one mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Great Smoky Mountains National Park.
 
More about this marker. This marker is on the Mountain Farm Museum
 
Categories. Settlements & Settlers
 
The Meathouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, October 19, 2008
3. The Meathouse Marker
Hogs image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, October 19, 2008
4. Hogs
Hogs were the main source of meat on mountain farms. They could produce several large litters of offspring each year, which helped insure a family's supply of meat. Surplus livestock could also be sold to produce extra income for the family. The meat was relatively easy to preserve, usually by curing it with salt, and the lard produced from the fat was used in cooking and soap making. Hogs were so self-sufficient that they were turned out into the forest to forage for food. Fall was the only time many families penned some of their hogs to fatten them for butchering. To keep track of their hogs and avoid disputes over ownership, farmers frequently cut identifying marks into the animal's ears.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 808 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina.   2. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3, 4. submitted on , by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on October 22, 2016.
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