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Richmond Hill in Bryan County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Columbiad

 
 
Columbiad Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, October 5, 2008
1. Columbiad Marker
Inscription. This replica of a coast defense cannon known as the columbiad was manufactured, 1964, by Savannah Machine and Foundry Company as a public service. A similar cannon was positioned here during Union naval attacks, 1863. The columbiad fired 87-lb. shells; its range was 2,500 yds.
 
Erected 1964 by Georgia Historical Commission.
 
Location. 31° 53.485′ N, 81° 11.74′ W. Marker is in Richmond Hill, Georgia, in Bryan County. Marker can be reached from Fort McAllister Road. Click for map. Located at Fort McAllister State Park. Marker is in this post office area: Richmond Hill GA 31324, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Position of the Monitors (a few steps from this marker); Major Gallie's Gun (a few steps from this marker); Obstruction of River (within shouting distance of this marker); Damage From Naval Bombardments (within shouting distance of this marker); Cheves' Rice Mill (within shouting distance of this marker); Capt. Nicholas Clinch (within shouting distance of this marker); Confederate Land Mines (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Tom Cat (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Richmond Hill.
 
Also see . . .
Columbiad Reproduction image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
2. Columbiad Reproduction
Columbiad - A form of seacoast cannon; a long, chambered gun designed for throwing shot or shells with heavy charges of powder, at high angles of elevation. This example is patterned after the Model of 1844.

1. The Columbiad. was a large caliber, smoothbore, muzzle loading cannon able to fire heavy projectiles at both high and low trajectories. (Submitted on October 21, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. Heated shot. (Submitted on October 21, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.)
3. Hot Shot Furnace by Paul Branch,. Hot Shot Furnace are structures included in the typical defenses of any fort which were used to heat non-explosive cannonballs red hot for the purpose of setting fire to enemy warships, buildings or equipment. (Submitted on October 21, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 
Columbiad image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
3. Columbiad
Columbiad image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
4. Columbiad
Confederate States also used columbiads extensively, mostly stocks captured from Federal arsenals at the time of secession. These acquitted themselves well against early ironclad warships. In addition, the Confederates produced limited quantities of eight-inch and ten-inch columbiads without the Rodman process; these could not withstand sustained use. The Confederates also rifled some columbiads in an effort to improve weapon performance. ( see link )
Hot Shot Furnace image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, October 5, 2008
5. Hot Shot Furnace
The hot shot oven was used to heat cannonballs red hot to set fire to attacking wooden vessels. Georgia Historical Commission 1964
Hot Shot Furnace Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
6. Hot Shot Furnace Marker
They are about six to eight feet wide, and from eight to over 30 feet in length. A brick chimney is situated at one end with a firebox located in the front or side of the opposite end. The interior of the furnace is lined with fire brick and contains a set of sloping iron rails to hold rows of cannonballs.
Hot Shot Furnace image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
7. Hot Shot Furnace
Hot Shot Furnace image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, October 5, 2008
8. Hot Shot Furnace
Columbiad Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, October 5, 2008
9. Columbiad Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,128 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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