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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Orange in Delaware County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

The Gooding House and Tavern / Rural Taverns in Early Ohio History

 
 
The Gooding House and Tavern Marker (side A) image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 21, 2008
1. The Gooding House and Tavern Marker (side A)
Inscription.
The Gooding House and Tavern
Known as the "Halfway House," the Gooding House and Tavern was built by George B. Gooding halfway between the towns of Worthington and Delaware in 1827. Its location was influenced by construction of the Columbus and Sandusky Turnpike that was chartered by the State of Ohio the year before. Also known as the "Mud Pike," the turnpike was slow and difficult for travelers and could take nearly a day to travel 10 miles. The Gooding House was the perfect place for stagecoach drivers to change teams of horses and for travelers to rest and have refreshments. George Gooding also prospered as a farmer with over 1,000 acres of land. This stately brick farmstead remained in the Gooding family for 175 years with each succeeding generation adding its imprint on the property. The Gooding House and Tavern was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2005 and restored in 2007.

Rural Taverns in Early Ohio History
Stagecoach and wagon travel during the early 1800s in Ohio was arduous, and the rural tavern played an essential role by providing a place to change horses and give passengers shelter and refreshment. Early taverns and inns often featured a large public room with a tap room at one end and a dining room to the rear, the kitchen and pantry in
Rural Taverns in Early Ohio History Marker (side B) image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 21, 2008
2. Rural Taverns in Early Ohio History Marker (side B)
an extension or ell, and guest bedrooms on the second floor. Although the quality of accommodations varied widely, laws required the tavern owner to be licensed and to provide food and shelter in addition to alcoholic beverages. Often, the tavern was the only public location between settlements, playing an important role in early communication and business. Tavern operators were often farmers as well, providing a ready market for their agricultural goods. As the railroads eclipsed road travel in the 1850s, the traditional stagecoach inn and tavern began to die out.
 
Erected 2008 by The Strategy Group for Media and The Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 17-21.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection marker series.
 
Location. 40° 10.9′ N, 83° 1.461′ W. Marker is in Orange, Ohio, in Delaware County. Marker is on Columbus Pike (U.S. 23) just north of Orange Point Drive, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is near US 23 and Orange Point Drive. Marker is in this post office area: Lewis Center OH 43035, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Four Chaplains (approx. 0.7 miles away); Kingwood Memorial Park Veterans Memorial
The Gooding House and Tavern and Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 21, 2008
3. The Gooding House and Tavern and Marker
(approx. 0.7 miles away); James Kilbourne / Anson Williams (approx. 0.7 miles away); Liberty Presbyterian Church / Nathan Carpenter (approx. 1.8 miles away); The Union Land Company and the Case Family / The Olentangy River Road (approx. 2.1 miles away); Powell WW I Memorial (approx. 3.1 miles away); Africa Community (approx. 3.3 miles away); Flint Veterans Garden (approx. 3.5 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Orange.
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceLandmarksNotable BuildingsRoads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers
 
The Gooding House and Tavern image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 21, 2008
4. The Gooding House and Tavern
Half-way House Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Joel Seewald, August 23, 2016
5. Half-way House Plaque
Plaque to the left of the entrance.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 2,432 times since then and 29 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   5. submitted on , by Joel Seewald of Madison Heights, Michigan. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on September 25, 2016.
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