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Edgefield in Edgefield County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

George McDuffie

August 10, 1790 - March 11, 1851

 

—Governor 1834-1836 —

 
George McDuffie Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 10, 2008
1. George McDuffie Marker
Inscription.
McDuffie was a strong
advocate for the right of
states to nullify or void acts
of Congress within their
borders. He developed and
promoted the Nullification
Theory & also served in the
U.S. House and U.S. Senate.

 
Location. 33° 47.233′ N, 81° 55.5′ W. Marker is in Edgefield, South Carolina, in Edgefield County. Marker is on Main Street. Click for map. Marker is located at the south end of the town parking lot, at the start of the ten Governors Trail. Marker is in this post office area: Edgefield SC 29824, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Town of Edgefield Parking Lot (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Andrew Pickens (about 400 feet away); Piedmont Technical College, Edgefield Center (about 400 feet away); Pierce Mason Butler (about 500 feet away); Edgefield United Methodist Church / The Reverend Joseph Moore (approx. 0.2 miles away); Edgefield (approx. 0.2 miles away); Oakley Park Museum (approx. 0.2 miles away); James Henry Hammond (approx. 0.2 miles away); Old Law Building (approx. 0.2 miles away); J. Strom Thurmond Birthplace (approx. ¼ mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Edgefield.
 
More about this marker.
George McDuffie Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 10, 2008
2. George McDuffie Marker
This marker is the second along the Ten Governor's Trail, a converted railroad bed that has been paved. There are markers to each of the 10 governors placed every 0.9 of a mile.
 
Also see . . .
1. George McDuffie. George McDuffie (August 10, 1790 – March 11, 1851) was a Governor of South Carolina and a member of the United States Senate. (Submitted on October 23, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. South Carolina Governor George McDuffie. George McDuffie was born in Columbia County, Georgia. (Submitted on October 23, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Nullification Crisis. The Nullification Crisis was a sectional crisis during the presidency of Andrew Jackson created by the Ordinance of Nullification, an attempt by the state of South Carolina to nullify a federal law passed by the United States Congress. (Submitted on October 23, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Nullification Convention. From 1824 to 1832, most if not all of the principles that were fought for during the American Civil War were implemented in South Carolina. (Submitted on October 23, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Cherry Hill / Noble Cemetery. Marker located in Willington, SC dedicated to Cherry Hill, home of George McDuffie. (Submitted on January 4, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. George McDuffie
Governor George McDuffie<br>(1790-1851) image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
3. Governor George McDuffie
(1790-1851)
S.C. General Assembly 1818-1821
U.S. House of Representatives from S.C. 1821-1834
Governor of S.C. 1834–1836
U.S. Senator from S.C. 1842–1846
(1790-1851)

George McDuffie, (father-in-law of Wade Hampton [1818-1902]), a Representative and a Senator from South Carolina; born in Columbia County, Ga., August 10, 1790; attended an old-field school and a private academy; graduated from South Carolina College (now the University of South Carolina) at Columbia in 1813; studied law; admitted to the bar in 1814 and commenced practice in Pendleton, Anderson County, S.C.; member, State house of representatives 1818-1819; elected to the Seventeenth and to the six succeeding Congresses and served from March 4, 1821, until his resignation in 1834; chairman, Committee on Ways and Means (Nineteenth through Twenty-second Congresses); one of the managers appointed by the House of Representatives in 1830 to conduct the impeachment proceedings against James H. Peck; Governor of South Carolina 1834-1836; president of the board of trustees of South Carolina College; elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of William C. Preston; reelected, and served from December 23, 1842, until August 17, 1846, when he resigned; chairman, Committee on Foreign Relations (Twenty-ninth Congress); died at ‘Cherry Hill,’ Sumter District (now Sumter County), S.C., March 11, 1851; interment in Cherry Hill Cemetery, Sumter District, S.C. (Source: Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress.)
    — Submitted January 3, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Antebellum South, USGovernmentNotable PersonsPolitics
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 815 times since then and 7 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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