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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Brooklyn in Kings County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Battle Hill

Revolutionary War Heritage Trail

 
 
Battle Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 1, 2008
1. Battle Hill Marker
Inscription. Early in the morning of August 27, 1776, British troops came up the Narrows Road to attack American forces defending Brooklyn Heights. In and around this location, the highest natural point in Kings County, the outnumbered Americans put up a stiff resistance until nearly surrounded by the enemy.

From Battle Hill in Green-Wood Cemetery, established 1838, the scope and complexity of the fighting that day can be appreciated.

To the south is Gravesend Bay, where the British and Hessian forces landed five days before the battle. To the west is the Gowanus Canal, site of the former creek across which the retreating Americans fled to safety in Brooklyn Heights. To the east is Flatbush, from where the enemy launched a second attack against American positions in what is now Prospect Park. To the north is Brooklyn Heights vital to the defense of New York City, the ultimate objective of the British.
 
Erected by New York State.
 
Location. 40° 39.434′ N, 73° 59.373′ W. Marker is in Brooklyn, New York, in Kings County. Marker can be reached from Battle Avenue, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is in Green-Wood Cemetery on Battle Path off Battle Avenue. Marker is in this post office area: Brooklyn NY 11232, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Marker in Green-Wood Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 1, 2008
2. Marker in Green-Wood Cemetery
This photo shows the advantage that this high ground gave the Americans during the Battle of Long Island. Visible in the picture is the Statue of Liberty in the harbor.
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Huntington’s Regiment (here, next to this marker); Triumph on Battle Hill (here, next to this marker); Altar to Liberty (a few steps from this marker); Civil War Soldiers’ Monument (a few steps from this marker); The Battle of Brooklyn (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Brooklyn (within shouting distance of this marker); McDonald (within shouting distance of this marker); Governor DeWitt Clinton (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Brooklyn.
 
More about this marker. The bottom of the marker contains a sketch showing a “View From Battle Hill.” Above this are pictures of “Freeke’s Mill: Burnt on August 27th, 1776 while the Americans were retreating across Gowanus Creek,” and the “Commander in Chief & Staff.” All of these are from the Picture Collection, the Branch Libraries, the New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations. Also on the marker is a map of “A Plan of the Battle of Brooklyn. This map highlights the approximate location of this historic site.”
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Long Island, August 27, 1776. (Submitted on November 2, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
Marker on Battle Path image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 1, 2008
3. Marker on Battle Path

2. The Battle of Long Island 1776. A British perspective of the battle from BritishBattles.com. (Submitted on November 2, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

3. Battle Hill Monument. (Submitted on November 2, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
 
Categories. Notable EventsNotable PlacesWar, US Revolutionary
 
Marker with Minerva image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 1, 2008
4. Marker with Minerva
Seen in the background of this photo is the Altar to Liberty featuring Minerva, the Goddess of Wisdom, Glory and Patriotism.
Altar to Liberty image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 1, 2008
5. Altar to Liberty
The Altar to Liberty has been the primary monument commemorating the Battle of Long Island for almost a century. The statue of Minerva was designed with her arm raised in salute to the Statue of Liberty.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,451 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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