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Pomaria in Newberry County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
St. John's Church
 
St. John's Church Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 1, 2008
1. St. John's Church Marker
 
Inscription. This Lutheran church stands on a royal grant of 100 acres made in 1763 to John Adam Epting and Peter Dickert, elders of the Dissenting congregation on Crim's Creek. The origins of St. John's date as early as 1754, when the Reverend John Gasser settled near here. The church was incorporated in 1794 as "the German Lutheran Congregation of S1. John."
 
Erected 1970 by St. John's Church Congregation. (Marker Number 36-7.)
 
Location. 34° 15.133′ N, 81° 22.233′ W. Marker is in Pomaria, South Carolina, in Newberry County. Marker is on Hope Station Road, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 622 Hope Station Road, Pomaria SC 29126, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Hope Rosenwald School (approx. 1.3 miles away); Pomaria (approx. 2.6 miles away); Peak (approx. 2.9 miles away); Folk-Holloway House (approx. 3 miles away); Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary (approx. 3.5 miles away); Bethlehem Lutheran Church (approx. 4.2 miles away); Rev. Joachim Bulow. (approx. 4.8 miles away); St. Paul Lutheran Church (approx. 4.9 miles away); Spring Hill (approx. 7.4 miles away); Old Brick Church (approx. 7.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Pomaria.
 
St. John's Church and Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 1, 2008
2. St. John's Church and Marker
The building shown is the church's fourth. It was built in 1950.
 

 
Also see . . .
1. St. John's Lutheran Church. St. John’s is unusual architecturally, reflecting a more sophisticated design than is usually found in rural 19th century churches in South Carolina. (Submitted on November 2, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. The Epting Family. The Epting family of the SC Dutch Fork are descendants of Johann Adam Hepding and Christina Barbara Osiander who came to SC from the Duchy of Württemberg. (Submitted on November 2, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Marker Style
The marker shown reflects the second style of South Carolina Historical Markers. It was in use between 1955 and 1990. The original design was cast aluminum and crowned with a bas relief of the state flag surrounded by an inverted triangle. The markers were painted dark blue with silver lettering.
    — Submitted November 2, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

2. About St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church
The origins of St. John's date to 1754 when the Rev. John Gasser settled here, and built the first log church building. St. John's Lutheran Church stands on a royal grant of 100 acres of land given in 1763 to John Adam
 
St. John's Church Marker, looking south along Hope Station Road Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, 2011
3. St. John's Church Marker, looking south along Hope Station Road
 
Epting and Peter Dickert elders, on Crim's Creek by King George III of England.

A second log church building was built in 1763. Both buildings were destroyed by fire. A granite marker, in the far corner of the cemetery, designates the location of the first building. The third church was built in 1809, and is affectionately known as "The White Church." It is opened for special occasion during the year, and is believed to be one of the oldest wood frame churches in South Carolina.

The beautiful fourth brick church building is in a modified Gothic style, with the corner stone being laid in 1950. The nineteen lovely art stained glass windows and ecclesiastical furniture and appointments memorialize faithful members of days gone by. The pulpit is dedicated to the pastor with the longest term of service, Rev. Daniel Efird (1850-1882), and the iron railings to the front steps were made by William Carl Summer, the great grandson of Capt. John A. Summer who made the hardware for the third church building in 1809.

A well kept cemetery is maintained by the St. John's Cemetery Association, with graves dating to the early 1700s.

St. John's members continue to strive for the best for this congregation. In the year 2003 the congregation, under the direction of the Historical Ministry, purchased a fire resistant safe to house the precious artifacts. These items
 
St. John's Church Marker, looking south along Hope Station Rd. Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, 2011
4. St. John's Church Marker, looking south along Hope Station Rd.
 
are put on display, usually during Home Coming, at least once a year in the Archive Room. In 2004 the church celebrated its 250th anniversary with year long events, and as part of that celebration a beautiful Prayer Garden was added for anyone that would like to take a few moments to reflect and pray.

If you have a group that would like to tour "The White Church", please call the church office at 803-276-5543 and leave a message. Someone will contact you to set up a date and time.

(Source: Brochure available at the marker.)
    — Submitted November 2, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
 
St. John's Church, 3rd Building - Known as the "White Church" Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 1, 2008
5. St. John's Church, 3rd Building - Known as the "White Church"
 
 
St. John's Church Cemetery Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 1, 2008
6. St. John's Church Cemetery
 
 
St. John's Church, 4th Building, and Cemetery Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 1, 2008
7. St. John's Church, 4th Building, and Cemetery
 
 
The White Church and Cemetery Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 1, 2008
8. The White Church and Cemetery
 
 
Side Building Near the White Church Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 1, 2008
9. Side Building Near the White Church
 
 
Dr. Henri Schmitz Tombstone (St. John's Church Cemetery) Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 1, 2008
10. Dr. Henri Schmitz Tombstone (St. John's Church Cemetery)
Dr. Henri F. Schmitz
Died 1826

A German physician, came to Am.
in 1760, officer in the Am. Rev.,
petitioner for St. Johns Ch. in 1794
Wife
Anna Mary Leitner
Dau. of Michael Leitner
 
 
Site of the First St. John's Church - A Log Structure Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 1, 2008
11. Site of the First St. John's Church - A Log Structure
John Adam Epting and Peter Dickert, officers of St. john's congregation, received a grant of 100 acres of land from King George III of England for church and religious purposes. This stone marks the location of the first church building.
 
 
Site of the First St. John's Church - A Log Structure Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 1, 2008
12. Site of the First St. John's Church - A Log Structure
The marker is located in the northwest corner of the cemetery, near the tree line.
 
 
St. John's Church Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud
13. St. John's Church
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on November 2, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,355 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 2, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3, 4. submitted on July 26, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12. submitted on November 2, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   13. submitted on July 26, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.
 
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