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Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Bloody Wheatfield

 

—July 2 1863 - Second Day —

 
The Bloody Wheatfield Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2008
1. The Bloody Wheatfield Marker
Inscription. "It was here that the crash came. A storm of lead swept through our ranks like hail."
Pvt. James Houghton, USA
4th Michigan Infantry

In the summer of 1863, the golden wheat grew tall here. But at 4:30 p.m. on July 2, the Wheatfield was transformed into a whirlpool of death. Over a period of 2-1/2 hours this ground changed hands six times as Confederates of Longstreet's Corps attempted to smash the loosely-knit Union line.

The Confederate attackers came from your rear and left; Union reinforcements moved into the area from your front and right. In the various actions, soldiers found ready-made defenses at the stone wall behind you, and on the "stony hill" to your left. With each new attack, casualties mounted.

When the Union advance position at the Peach Orchard (1/2-mile northwest of here, to your left) collapsed about 6:30 p.m., Confederates began to surround the Wheatfield. The Federals fell back toward Cemetery Ridge, leaving pools of blood along their retreat route. By nightfall, the ravaged Wheatfield belonged to the Confederates.
 
Erected by Gettysburg National Military Park.
 
Location. 39° 47.776′ N, 77° 14.602′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County
The Wheatfield Pulloff image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2008
2. The Wheatfield Pulloff
. Marker is on Sickles Avenue, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Located at stop 9, the Wheatfield section, of the driving tour of Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Second Brigade (within shouting distance of this marker); 4th Michigan Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); Third Brigade (within shouting distance of this marker); 62nd Pennsylvania Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); 17th Maine Infantry (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); 57th New York Infantry (about 400 feet away); 115th Pennsylvania Infantry (about 400 feet away); 148th Pennsylvania Infantry (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
More about this marker. In the center of the marker displays a painting by Gil Cohen depicting the aftermath of battle in the Wheatfield on the evening of July 2.

On the upper right is a painting of the Irish Brigade receiving absolution. Just before entering the desperate fight in the Wheatfield, Union soldiers of the Irish Brigade receive absolution from their sins. Father William Corby, their chaplain, commended their souls to God, and exhorted them not to turn their backs on
The Heavily Contested Wheatfield image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2008
3. The Heavily Contested Wheatfield
the enemy. Maj. St. Clair Mulholland remembered the "awe-inspiring" scene. "I do not think there was a man in the brigade who did not offer up a heartfelt prayer. For some it was their last..."


On the lower right is a portrait. Only a few yards from where you are standing, Col. Harrison H. Jeffords used his revolver to re-capture the colors of his 4th Michigan Regiment. A moment later a Confederate thrust a bayonet into his body, mortally wounding him.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. The Wheatfield virtual tour by markers.
 
Also see . . .  The Wheatfield. National Park Service virtual tour stop. (Submitted on November 6, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
The Bloody Wheatfield winter view. image. Click for full size.
By Henry T. McLin, January 3, 2009
4. The Bloody Wheatfield winter view.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,969 times since then and 48 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on , by Henry T. McLin of Hanover, Pennsylvania. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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