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Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Jones's Brigade

Johnson's Division - Ewell's Corps

 

—Army of Northern Virginia —

 
Jones's Brigade Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2008
1. Jones's Brigade Tablet
Inscription.
C.S.A.
Army of Northern Virginia
Ewell's Corps Johnson's Division
Jones's Brigade

21st. 25th. 42nd. 44th. 48th. 50th.
Virginia Infantry

July 1 Arrived near nightfall and took position east of Rock Creek and north of Hanover Road with pickets advanced to the front.

July 2 About 4 p.m. moved forward to support Artillery on Benner's Hill. Crossed Rock Creek at 6 p.m. and assailed the Union position on the summit of Culp's Hill charging up the steep northern slope nearly to the Union breastworks and continuing the struggle until dark.

July 3 In line near here all day sometimes skirmishing heavily. About midnight moved with the Division and Corps to Seminary Ridge northwest of the town.

July 4 Occupied Seminary Ridge. About 10 p.m. began the march to Hagerstown.

Present 1600. Killed 58, wounded 302, missing 61. Total 421.
 
Erected 1910 by Gettysburg National Military Park Commission.
 
Location. 39° 49.342′ N, 77° 13.206′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is on East Confederate Avenue, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Located on the road up to Culp's Hill, Stop 13 on the driving tour of Gettysburg
Jones's Brigade Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2008
2. Jones's Brigade Tablet
National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Nicholls's Brigade (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); 7th Indiana Infantry (about 800 feet away); 76th New York Infantry (about 800 feet away); 95th New York Infantry (about 800 feet away); Battlefield Landmarks - North and West (approx. 0.2 miles away); 66th Ohio Infantry (approx. 0.2 miles away); Battery K, Fifth U.S. Artillery (approx. 0.2 miles away); Battlefield Landmarks - South and West (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Culp's Hill. National Park Service virtual tour stop. (Submitted on November 12, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Report of Brig. Gen. J. M. Jones. Concerning the action on Culp's Hill, Jones wrote:
At this time, the major-general commanding arrived upon the hill occupied by the artillery, and after a short time directed me to form my brigade in line, to move forward where Nicholls' brigade had formed on my left, and to attack the enemy in his position on the opposite hill. The brigade advanced in good order, moving down the slope of the hill, across the bottom (Gettysburg Creek), and up
Jones' Brigade Advances up Culp's Hill image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2008
3. Jones' Brigade Advances up Culp's Hill
Looking north past the tablet location. Jones' Brigade advanced from Benner's Hill and crossed Rock Creek, just to the east of this point. The Brigade then crossed through this general area while advancing up the northeast slope of Culp's Hill. The stone wall to the right is noted on some tour guides as "Jones' Breastworks" and may have been used in later stages of the battle.
the hill occupied by the enemy. The hill was steep, heavily timbered, rocky, and difficult of ascent. As the brigade advanced, a few shells were thrown from the batteries on the right, though but little damage resulted from them. My men gained ground steadily to the front, under a heavy fire of musketry from the enemy, protected by intrenchments. There was at one time some confusion toward the left, which I corrected as rapidly as possible. This confusion consisted in the mixing up of the files and the derangement of the general line, and was, perhaps, unavoidable from the lateness of the hour at which the advance was made, the darkness in the woods, and the nature of the hill. When near the first line of intrenchments, moving with my troops, I received a flesh wound through the thigh, the excessive hemorrhage from which rendered it necessary for me to be borne from the field, and the command of the brigade devolved upon Lieutenant-Colonel Dungan, Col. J. C. Higginbotham having been previously wounded. The brigade acted with efficiency while I was with it.
(Submitted on November 12, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
"The hill was steep, heavily timbered, rocky, and difficult of ascent." image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2008
4. "The hill was steep, heavily timbered, rocky, and difficult of ascent."
Rock outcroppings on the north side of Culp's Hill, near where Jones' Brigade attacked the Federal lines.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 627 times since then and 7 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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