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Union in Union County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Culp-Beaty Hall

 
 
Culp-Beaty Hall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, November 13, 2008
1. Culp-Beaty Hall Marker
Inscription.
[Front Side]:
This Greek Revival house was built ca. 1857 for Benjamin Dudley Culp (1821-1885) and his wife Cornelia Meng Culp (1830-1888). Culp, a Union merchant, owned stores on Main Street with partners J.T. Hill and H.L. Goss from the 1850s through the 1870s. In early 1861 the "Johnson Rifles," a volunteer company soon to become a Confederate company in the 5th S.C. Infantry, received its silk flag in a ceremony here. The flag in now (2006) in the Union County Museum.

[Reverse Side]:
In 1876, Gen. Wade Hampton, running for governor, made a campaign speech from the second-story portico. The house passed to the Beaty family through B.D. Culp's daughter Cornelia C. Beaty (1864-1892), wife of William T. Beaty (1864-1944). This house, which features massive fluted Doric columns and a full width two-story portico with large brackets and a pierced blaustrade, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1975.
 
Erected 2006 by Union County Historical Society. (Marker Number 44-12.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the South Carolina, Union County Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 34° 43.158′ N, 81° 37.308′ W. Marker
Culp-Beaty Hall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, November 13, 2008
2. Culp-Beaty Hall Marker
reverse side
is in Union, South Carolina, in Union County. Marker is at the intersection of North Mountain Street and Hames Street, in the median on North Mountain Street. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 300 North Mountain Street, Union SC 29379, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Presbyterian Cemetery (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Union County Veterans Memorial (approx. ¼ mile away); Jefferson Davis Dined in This House (approx. 0.3 miles away); Union Mill (approx. 0.3 miles away); Union County Revolutionary War (approx. 0.3 miles away); Union County Confederate Monument (approx. 0.3 miles away); John Pratt (approx. 0.4 miles away); Union County Jail (approx. 0.4 miles away); Union Community Hospital (approx. 0.4 miles away); Episcopal Church Of The Nativity (approx. 0.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Union.
 
Regarding Culp-Beaty Hall. Access may be limited. Also, there is a lot of vegetation around the house that obscures the house.
 
Also see . . .
1. Culp House. The Culp House, a classically styled two-story brick structure, was constructed for Mr. B. D. Culp, a prosperous businessman in early Union. (Submitted on November 13, 2008, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina.) 

2. From The Culps and Allied Families by Benjamin Dudley Culp
Culp-Beaty Hall image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, November 13, 2008
3. Culp-Beaty Hall
. In The Culps and Allied Families, by Benjamin Dudley Culp, on pages 94 – 100, he tells the story of his ride through Sherman’s Army to warn the family group of the danger. (Submitted on November 13, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. W.T. Beaty gives museum pieces used to serve Confederate president. It was April 28, 1865, and the well-bred ladies of Union pooled their resources to entertain a very special guest. (Submitted on August 21, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Wade Hampton III. Wade Hampton III (March 28, 1818 – April 11, 1902) was a Confederate cavalry leader during the American Civil War and afterwards a politician from South Carolina, serving as its governor and as a U.S. Senator. (Submitted on November 13, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Red Shirts (Southern United States). The Red Shirts or Redshirts of the Southern United States were white paramilitary groups in the 19th century, active primarily after formal Reconstruction. (Submitted on August 21, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. 5th SC Infantry Regiment. This was one of the first regiments organized by direction of Governor Pickens early in 1861, under authority of An Act to provide an Armed Military Force, passed by the General Assembly of
Culp-Beaty Hall image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, November 13, 2008
4. Culp-Beaty Hall
Gate Sign
South Carolina, December 17, 1860. (Submitted on November 13, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Culp House
Exterior
The front facade of this two-story red brick structure features a two-tiered, five bay porch with a classic revival motif. Roman Doric columns, pilasters, and a pierced balustrade on the upper porch combine to achieve this classic effect.

The eight-panel center door with transom is balanced by 2/2 lights with small panel doors on the lower portion allowing access form the parlors to the porch area. The sidelights of the entry door and center balcony door are repeated in Palladian-derived windows with sidelights. Brackets under the eaves and louvered shutters further compliment this facade. The shingled hip roof is punctuated by two interior chimneys.

The left elevation with paired 2/2 lights has a broad belt course and a plain cornice. The brick of the rear elevation has been covered in masonry and the original stoop enlarged and enclosed to provide a modern kitchen, using old brick to blend with the original structure.

The double-tiered porch of the right elevation has been enclosed to provide additional living space and plumbing facilities.

Interior
Four
Gov. Wade Hampton<br>(1818–1902) image. Click for full size.
circa 1865/1880
5. Gov. Wade Hampton
(1818–1902)
Governor of South Carolina 1877-1879
U.S. Senator from South Carolina 1879-1891
United States Railroad Commissioner 1893-1897
large rooms with heart pine floor boards open off the central hall. The interior plastered walls of brick are more than a foot thick. The twelve-foot high ceilings feature unusual medallions - a garland wreath in the right front parlor and a heavy stylized leaf design in the entrance hall. The curving staircase and classic wall niche in the entry hall further enhance the classic proportions of the interior.

An identical room arrangement is to be found on the second floor with a center door opening from the hallway to the upper porch.

Surroundings
Large oak trees surround the house and shade the gardens. Several of the terraces are undergoing restoration as flower and herb gardens. The cook's house which is believed to be the original detached kitchen is still standing, although in poor condition.

Significance
The Culp House, a classically styled two-story brick structure, was constructed for Mr. B.D. Culp, a prosperous businessman in early Union. The Culp House served as a focal point for political activity in Union County during the 19th Century.

Architecture: Derived from the transitional architecture trends of the 1850s, the Culp House combined both Georgian and neo-classical motifs. The South Carolina low country flavor of the structure with its wide porticos and airy window treatments reflects the builder's familiarity with the domestic architecture of Charleston, where he conducted a successful cotton trade.

Military: B.F. Arthur, secretary of the Secession Convention, delivered an oration from the Culp House porch to the Johnson Rifles regiment on January 31, 1861. At this time a flag designed by Union ladies under the direction of Mrs. Madison Wallace, sister-in-law of B.D. Culp, was presented to the regiment. This flag is now in a private collection.

Political: In October 1876, gubernatorial candidate Wade Hampton delivered a campaign address from the second story porch of the house to a crowd of supporters and a mounted troop of his partisan "Red Shirt" followers. The subsequent election of wade Hampton to the Governor's office marked the end of Federal Reconstruction in South Carolina. (Source: National Register nomination form.)
    — Submitted August 21, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Notable BuildingsWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,158 times since then and 20 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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