“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)

Daniel's Brigade

Rodes's Division - Ewell's Corps


—Army of Northern Virginia —

Daniel's Brigade Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2008
1. Daniel's Brigade Tablet
Army of Northern Virginia
Ewell's Corps Rodes's Division
Daniel's Brigade

32nd. 43rd. 45th. 53rd. Regiments and
2nd. Battalion North Carolina Infantry

July 3 After taking part in the battles of the First and Second Days elsewhere on the fields the Brigade marched about 1.30 a.m. from its position in the town to Culp's Hill to reinforce Johnson's Division.

Arriving about 4 p.m. it fought at different points wherever ordered through the long an fierce conflict its main position being in the ravine between the two summits of Culp's Hill. At the close of the struggle near noon it was withdrawn by Gen. Johnson with the rest of his line to the base of the Hill from whence it moved during the night to Seminary Ridge west of the town and there rejoined Rodes's Division.

July 4 Occupied Seminary Ridge. Late at night began the march to Hagerstown.

Present 2100. Killed 185, wounded 635, missing 116. Total 918.
Erected 1910 by Gettysburg National Military Park Commission.
Location. 39° 49.139′ N, 77° 12.973′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is on East Confederate Avenue, on the right when traveling south. Click for map
Daniel's Brigade Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2008
2. Daniel's Brigade Tablet
. Located on the road up to Culp's Hill, Stop 13 on the driving tour of Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Forty-Third North Carolina Regiment (within shouting distance of this marker); O'Neal's Brigade (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Johnson's Division (about 500 feet away); Steuart's Brigade (about 700 feet away); 147th New York Infantry (approx. 0.2 miles away); 102 & 78th New York Infantry (approx. 0.2 miles away); 149th New York Infantry (approx. 0.2 miles away); 150th New York Infantry (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Daniel's Brigade at Gettysburg.
Also see . . .  Report of Brig. Gen. Junins Daniel. General Daniel described his Brigade's actions on Culp's Hill:
In taking the position assigned me, the Thirty-second Regiment was subjected to a heavy artillery fire in a much exposed situation, which, however, it bore with great courage and steadiness. On coming up with Jones' brigade, I found its skirmishers engaging the enemy at long range. The
Daniel's Brigade Sector image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2008
3. Daniel's Brigade Sector
Daniel's Brigade advanced up the slope of Culp's Hill (to the right) near the tablet location. Later, after the Federals had pressed the Confederates off the crest, the Brigade reformed in the low ground between Rock Creek and what is today East Confederate Avenue.
hill in front of this position was, in my opinion, so strong that it could not have been carried by any force. After remaining here some two or three hours. I was ordered to move by the left flank to the left, under the guidance of a staff officer, who hail been sent to conduct me to the position it was desired I should occupy. In executing this movement, my troops were much exposed, and many were killed and wounded. On reaching the left, I received orders from General Johnson to charge the enemy's works, in conjunction with General Steuart. This charge was made in a most gallant manner, and the enemy driven from a portion of their works in front of my center and right, and near the works captured the evening before by Jones' brigade. Owing to the heavy fire brought upon General Steuart, he was unable to advance farther, and I was, therefore, unable to occupy the works of the enemy; but from a sheltered position, within less than 50 paces, I obtained through a gorge between their lines of intrenchments a most destructive fire with the whole of the Forty-fifth Regiment for five minutes upon a crowd of the enemy who were disorganized and fleeing in great confusion. And here, owing to the fact that the enemy were returning our fire at this time very feebly, and that our own aim was unobstructed, we succeeded in inflicting heavy loss upon them. This position I held, bringing a heavy, though unequal, fire on the fresh columns that came down to the relief of those that had been broken and were leaving their works, until ordered by General Johnson to fall back with the rest of his line about three-quarters of a mile, and occupy the position along a run at the foot of the hill.
(Submitted on November 14, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
Categories. War, US Civil
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 707 times since then and 69 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on September 7, 2016.
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