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Honolulu in Honolulu County, Hawaii — Hawaiian Island Archipelago (Pacific Ocean)
 

King William Charles Lunalilo

Jan. 31, 1835 – Feb. 3, 1874

 
 
King William Charles Lunalilo Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
1. King William Charles Lunalilo Marker
Inscription. King Kamehameha V died on December 11, 1872, without naming a successor to the throne. Prince William Charles Lunalilo was the highest ranking Chief at that time. Instead of claiming his birthright to the throne, he wanted the people to choose their next ruler in a democratic way. Lunalilo requested a special election which pitted him against David Kalakaua, a High Chief, but not of the Kamehameha line. Seven days later on January 8, 1873, an entire city cheered as the Legislature proclaimed that Lunalilo was not only “the people’s choice” for king, but “the Legislature’s choice” too. On January 9, 1873, the coronation of Lulalilo took place in Kawaiaha‘o Church.

King Lunalilo died at thirty-nine years of age on February 3, 1874. He had reigned for only one year and twenty five days. Lunalilo did not name a successor to the throne. He insisted that the choice of the next monarch should rest in the hands of his people. The service for Lunalilo was conducted by the Reverend Henry Parker of Kawaiaha‘o Church and his body was temporarily taken to the Royal Mausoleum in Nu‘uanu Valley until his tomb at Kawaiaha‘o Church was ready.

One of the king’s last wishes was to be put to rest at Kaiwaia‘o Church instead of the Royal Mausoleum. Lunalilo was “the people’s choice.” They had loved
King William Charles Lunalilo Mausoleum and Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
2. King William Charles Lunalilo Mausoleum and Marker
him and he had returned their love. By being buried at the cemetery with the common people he loved he felt he would be closer to them. When the remains of Hawai‘s’s royalty were removed from the Royal Tomb on ‘Iolani Palace grounds and taken to the Royal Mausoleum in Nu‘uanu, the remains of Lunalilo‘s mother, Kekauluohi, were not taken to the Royal Mausoleum. This may have been an oversight; no one knows. However, Lunalilo chose to be buried on Kawaiaha‘o Church grounds and not at the Royal Mausoleum.
 
Location. 21° 18.283′ N, 157° 51.493′ W. Marker is in Honolulu, Hawaii, in Honolulu County. Marker is at the intersection of Punchbowl Street and South King Street, on the left when traveling south on Punchbowl Street. Click for map. It is inside the driveway to Kaiwaia‘o Church, on the right, in front of the Lunalilo Mausoleum. Marker is in this post office area: Honolulu HI 96813, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Kawaiaha‘o Landmark (a few steps from this marker); Kawaiaha'o Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Hiram Bingham (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Kawaiaha'o Landmark (within shouting distance of this
King William Charles Lunalilo (1835–1874) image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
3. King William Charles Lunalilo (1835–1874)
Closeup of photo embedded in the marker.
marker); Reverend James Kekela (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); First Hawaiian Printing (about 600 feet away); King Kamehameha I (about 600 feet away); Aliiolani Hale (about 600 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Honolulu.
 
More about this marker. The mausoleum, on the grounds of the Kaiwaia‘o Church, was designed by Robert Lishman.
 
Regarding King William Charles Lunalilo. King Lunalilo died from tuberculosis while he was convalescing on Kailua Island. It is said that he had intended for Queen Emma to succeed him, but died before a formal proclamation could be made.
 
Also see . . .  Lunalilo I, born William Charles Lunalilo. Wikipedia entry. “So great was Lunalilo’s popularity that some people in the kingdom believed that Lunalilo could have simply walked into the capital and declared himself king. Lunalilo, however, insisted that the constitution be followed. He issued the following message six days after the death of the King:

‘Whereas, It is desirable that the wishes of the Hawaiian people be consulted as to a successor to the Throne, Therefore,
“Lunalilo Ka Moi. 1874.” image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
4. “Lunalilo Ka Moi. 1874.”
Not with standing that according to the law of inheritance, I am the rightful her to the Throne, in order to preserve peace, harmony and good order, I desire to submit the decision of my claim to the voice of the people’.” (Submitted on November 23, 2008.) 
 
Categories. Notable Persons
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,660 times since then and 27 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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