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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Gambier in Knox County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

John Crowe Ransom & The Kenyon Review

 
 
John Crowe Ransom Marker (side A) image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., November 16, 2008
1. John Crowe Ransom Marker (side A)
Inscription. Side A:
In 1938 the president of Kenyon College, Gordon Keith Chalmers, brought one of the nation's most distinguished poets and critics, John Crowe Ransom, to the Gambier Hill. Chalmers brought Ransom to Kenyon College to create a distinguished literary review. With its first appearance late in 1938, The Kenyon Review would become one of the most influential and honored literary magazines in America. Among the authors Ransom published during his two decades as editor were Robert Penn Warren, William Empson, Flannery O'Connor, Doris Lessing, Robert Lowell, and Randall Jarrell. The Kenyon Review also became closely identified with the “New Criticism,” a method of interpreting literature that influenced succeeding generations of readers and teachers around the world. (Continued other side)

Side B:
(Continued from other side) Aspiring writers made pilgrimages to Gambier to work with John Crowe Ransom. Poet Robert Lowell transferred from Harvard to Kenyon College to study with Ransom in 1938. Peter Taylor, one of America's greatest short story writers, soon appeared as well and became Lowell's roommate in Douglass House. (See Taylor's story “1939.”) Others there included Randall Jarrell and Robie Macauley. Along with F.O. Matthiessen and Lionel Trilling, Ransom founded the Kenyon School
John Crowe Ransom Marker (side B ) image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., November 16, 2008
2. John Crowe Ransom Marker (side B )
of English in 1948. The school operated for several summers and brought together students for the study of literature at the graduate level. In the 1940s and 50s, talented younger writers continued to arrive, including E.L. Doctorow and James Wright.
 
Erected 2003 by Ohio Bicentennial Commission and The Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 6-42.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection marker series.
 
Location. 40° 22.568′ N, 82° 23.911′ W. Marker is in Gambier, Ohio, in Knox County. Marker is at the intersection of Wiggin Street (Ohio Route 308) and Ward Street, on the left when traveling east on Wiggin Street. Click for map. Marker is in front of Gothic-style 19c. cottage. Marker is at or near this postal address: 102 Wiggin Street, Gambier OH 43022, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Kenyon College (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); George Wharton Marriott (about 500 feet away); David Bates Douglass (about 500 feet away); Colonel Lorin Andrews (about 700 feet away); Edward Bates Memorial
Cottage near John Crowe Ransom Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., November 16, 2008
3. Cottage near John Crowe Ransom Marker
(approx. mile away); Old Kenyon Cornerstone (approx. 0.3 miles away); 0-6-0 Steam Locomotive (approx. 0.6 miles away); Gambier (approx. 0.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Gambier.
 
Categories. 20th CenturyArts, Letters, MusicEducationNotable Persons
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 1,062 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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