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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

137th New York Infantry

3d Brigade, 2d Division

 

12th Corps

 
137th New York Infantry Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2008
1. 137th New York Infantry Monument
The monument incorporates a five pointed star at the top, the symbol of the XII Corps. Crossed rifles and a wreath surrounding a cartridge box complete the front artwork.
Inscription. (Front):
137th N.Y. Inf'y
3d Brig. 2d Div.
12th Corps

(Left):
The 137th
Regiment
of New York
Infantry
held this
position
July 2d 1863,
and until the
retreat of
the Rebel Army.

(Back):
Casualties
Killed 40,
Wounded 87,
Missing 10.

(Right):
For its services
in this
and many other
great battles
of the war
it holds a
proud position
in the history
of the
"Great Rebellion"

 
Erected 1888 by State of New York.
 
Location. 39° 49.054′ N, 77° 13.17′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is at the intersection of Slocum Avenue and Williams Avenue, on the right when traveling north on Slocum Avenue. Click for map. Located between the lower and upper crest of Culp's Hill in Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 29th Ohio Infantry (a few steps from this marker); 23d Pennsylvania Volunteers (a few steps from this marker); 67th New York Infantry (within
State Seal Disk on Front image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2008
2. State Seal Disk on Front
shouting distance of this marker); 7th Ohio Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); First Brigade (within shouting distance of this marker); 122nd New York Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); Second Division (within shouting distance of this marker); 82nd Pennsylvania Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Culp's Hill. National Park Service virtual tour stop. (Submitted on November 29, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. 137th New York Infantry. Regimental history page. The regiment was nicknamed "Ironclads." It was commanded by Colonel David Ireland at Gettysburg. (Submitted on November 29, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Left Side Inscription image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2008
3. Left Side Inscription
Back Inscription image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2008
4. Back Inscription
Right Side Inscription image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2008
5. Right Side Inscription
137th New York Infantry Monument as seen from the Road image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2008
6. 137th New York Infantry Monument as seen from the Road
137th New York Infantry Left Flank Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2008
7. 137th New York Infantry Left Flank Marker
Looking from the regiment's left flank marker toward the monument. The marker designates the original position of the regiment on the afternoon of July 2. When the rest of the Division had move to reinforce other sectors on the evening of July 2, the 137th was ordered to cover the ground vacated by Kane's and McDougal's Brigades near the lower crest of Culp's Hill, with barely 450 men. The New Yorkers resisted the superior numbers of Confederates, and bought time for reinforcements to arrive. Eventually, the regiment reoccupied a position their original lines. The other monuments nearby are those of Federal regiments which occupied portions of the line on July 3rd.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,393 times since then and 16 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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