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Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Battlefield Landmarks - North and West

 
 
Battlefield Landmarks - North and West Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 22, 2008
1. Battlefield Landmarks - North and West Marker
Inscription. "It had not been intended to deliver a general battle so far from our base unless attacked, but coming unexpectedly upon the whole Federal Army, to withdraw through the mountains with our extensive trains would have been difficult and dangerous."
Gen. Robert E. Lee, C.S.A.
Commander, Army of Northern Virginia

(1) Gettysburg
The seat of Adams County. In 1863 its population was about 2400. This farming community had no particular military value, but the ten roads that converged here helped to lead the armies into a confrontation.

After the battle, townspeople opened their homes and public buildings to thousands of wounded soldiers.

(2) Cashtown Pass
Most of Lee's Confederates approached Gettysburg through this gap in South Mountain. Many of Lee's hospital and supply trains withdrew from the battlefield the same way.

(3) Oak Ridge
On July 1, troops of the Union First Corps fought desperately here against Confederate forces attacking Gettysburg from the north and west. Unable to stop the onslaught, the Federals retreated through Gettysburg to Cemetery Hill.

(4) Barlow's Knoll
The right flank of the Union Eleventh Corps was positioned here on July 1st. In the late afternoon, the Confederate's attack on Barlow's Knoll caused the collapse of the Eleventh Corps
Observation Tower at Culp's Hill image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2008
2. Observation Tower at Culp's Hill
position. Union troops retreated through town and reformed on Cemetery Hill.

(5) Benner's Hill
Fourteen Confederate artillery pieces were positioned here from Ewell's Corps. At 4 p.m. on July 2nd, these cannon opened fire in support of the Confederate attack. Twenty-four Union guns replied from Cemetery Hill, Culp's Hill, and Stevens' Knoll to the Confederate fire. The unequal duel continued for an hour and a half and resulted in the severe repulse of the Confederate artillery.
 
Location. 39° 49.207′ N, 77° 13.228′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is on Culp's Hill Loop, in the median. Click for map. Located on the Observation Tower at the upper crest of Culp's Hill in Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battlefield Landmarks - South and West (here, next to this marker); Battery K, Fifth U.S. Artillery (a few steps from this marker); 7th Indiana Infantry (a few steps from this marker); 76th New York Infantry (a few steps from this marker); 95th New York Infantry (within shouting distance of this
Battlefield Landmarks - North and West Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, September 3, 2015
3. Battlefield Landmarks - North and West Marker
marker); Defense of Culp's Hill (within shouting distance of this marker); Independent Battery E (within shouting distance of this marker); George Sears Greene (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
More about this marker. The upper section of the marker is a panoramic photo looking to the north and west of the tower.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Panoramic View Looking North and West image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
4. Panoramic View Looking North and West
Trees obscure the view a few of the points indicated on the marker.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 789 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on , by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.   4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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