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Near Ramah in Cibola County, New Mexico — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

El Morro National Monument Inscription Rock

 
 
El Morro National Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 6, 2003
1. El Morro National Monument Marker
Inscription. Until it was by-passed by the railroad in the 1880s, its waterhole made El Morro an important stop for travelers in the Acoma- Zuni region. Numerous inscriptions carved in the sandstone date from the prehistoric, Spanish, Mexican, and Territorial periods in New Mexicos history. An important example is Oates inscription, carved in 1605.
 
Erected by State of New Mexico.
 
Location. 35° 2.595′ N, 108° 20.284′ W. Marker is near Ramah, New Mexico, in Cibola County. Marker is on New Mexico Route 53, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Ramah NM 87321, United States of America.
 
More about this marker. The El Morro National Monument is inside the Ramah Navajo Indian Reservation (between towns of Pinehill & El Moro), in Cibola County just to the east of the town of Ramah.
 
Regarding El Morro National Monument Inscription Rock. El Morro National Monument is located on an ancient east-west trail in western New Mexico.

The main feature of this National Monument is a great sandstone promontory with a pool of water at its base. As a shaded oasis in the western U.S. desert, this site has seen many centuries
The Bluff at El Morro image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2003
2. The Bluff at El Morro
Hundreds of years before Spanish conquistadores passed by here, a pools dependable water supply encouraged the settlement of Puebloan people on top of the bluff.
of travelers. The Spaniard explorers called it "El Morro" (The Headland). The Zuni Indians call it "A'ts'ina" (Place of writings on the rock). Anglo-Americans called it "Inscription Rock". Travelers left signatures, names, dates, and stories of their treks. While some of the inscriptions are fading, there are still many that can be seen today, some dating to the 17th century. Some petroglyphs and carvings were made by the Anasazi centuries before Europeans started making their mark. In 1906, U.S. federal law prohibited further carving.
 
Also see . . .  National Park Service. El Morro (Submitted on December 5, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. ExplorationLandmarksNative AmericansNatural FeaturesNotable PlacesSettlements & Settlers
 
Some petroglyphs and carvings were made by the Anasazi image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2003
3. Some petroglyphs and carvings were made by the Anasazi
The inscriptions date back to the 1600s when the Spanish traveled through the area.
Inscription from Don Juan de Oate, as mentioned on marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud
4. Inscription from Don Juan de Oate, as mentioned on marker
Translation: “Passed by here the Governor Don Juan de Oate, from the discovery of the Sea of the South on the 16th of April, 1605.”
El Morro waterhole image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2003
5. El Morro waterhole
A reliable waterhole hidden at the base of a sandstone bluff made El Morro (the headland) a popular campsite. Ancestral Puebloans and Spanish and American travelers carved over 2,000 signatures, dates, messages, and petroglyphs for hundreds of years.
After centuries of continuous human use, the pool today is used only by local wildlife taking advantage of its refreshing waters.
El Morro National Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 6, 2003
6. El Morro National Monument Marker
(L) "On the 25th of the month of June, of this year of 1709, passed by here on the way to Zuni, Ramon Garcia Jurado."
(R) "By here passed Pedro Romero on the 22nd of August, year of 1751."
In 1857, Breckinridge image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2003
7. In 1857, Breckinridge
was in charge of the 25 camels used by Lt. Edward Beale in his expedition.
Inscriptions at the point of El Morro image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 6, 2003
8. Inscriptions at the point of El Morro
include old Spanish carvings as well as English carved by members of the 1868 Union Pacific Railroad survey.
Inscription Rock image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2003
9. Inscription Rock
R.C. Logan Ohio 1866
E. Pen Long, Baltimore, Md
Inscription Rock image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2003
10. Inscription Rock
El Morro's Waterhole image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, March 16, 2009
11. El Morro's Waterhole
El Morro's waterhole is located at the base of the sandstone bluff shown in this photo.
More signatures, Petroglyphs image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, March 16, 2009
12. More signatures, Petroglyphs
One inscription reads "R.H. Orton, Capt. 1st Cal.. 1866". Also visible a petroglyph, perhaps a "cloud terrace" inspired church with cross.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 2,984 times since then and 142 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   11, 12. submitted on , by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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