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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Fredericksburg in Spotsylvania County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

George Washington: Statesman and Public Servant

 
 
George Washington: Statesman image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 24, 2008
1. George Washington: Statesman
Inscription. (Front):
George Washington: Statesman
Following the Treaty of Paris that guaranteed American independence from Great Britain in 1783, Washington became an influential mover in the steps leading to the Constitutional Convention at Philadelphia in 1787. Washington took his oath of office as the first United States president on April 30, 1789. Under his leadership, the new nation became an influential world power. Washington served two terms, conscious of the historic nature of his office; he was not only the first American president, but also the first elected head of state in western civilization. In office, Washington protected American neutrality in foreign affairs, established a strong central administration with three departments - Treasury, War, and State - and arbitrated successfully between political parties and regional factions.

(Back):
George Washington: Public Servant
George Washington was never out of the public eye for long, though he yearned for private life at Mount Vernon. He served willingly, but with caution. He was sensitive to criticism, yet subjected himself to it by giving his talents and experience to his country. He had a temper, but learned to control it, going on to demonstrate formidable leadership by example. He maintained an impeccable public appearance but in
George Washington: Public Servant image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 24, 2008
2. George Washington: Public Servant
battle would totally disregard his own personal comfort, even safety. He held strong opinions yet refrained from political partisanship. He kept the new nation out of war and steered it through wholly uncharted political waters, often not sure of the right course himself. His reward was the undying gratitude of a nation.
 
Erected by National Park Service in partnership with the George Washington's Fredericksburg Foundation.
 
Location. 38° 18.992′ N, 77° 30.298′ W. Marker is near Fredericksburg, Virginia, in Spotsylvania County. Marker is on Interstate 95, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Located in front of the Fredericksburg Rest Stop / Welcome Center on I-95 south bound, just past the Rappahannock River bridge. Marker is in this post office area: Fredericksburg VA 22401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. George Washington: Surveyor and Family Man (here, next to this marker); George Washington: Soldier and Virginia Planter (here, next to this marker); Historic Kenmore and George Washington's Ferry Farm (here, next to this marker); The Heights at Smith Run (approx. 0.9 miles away); The Vermont Brigade Counterattacks
One in a Set of Marker at the Welcome Center image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 22, 2008
3. One in a Set of Marker at the Welcome Center
(approx. 0.9 miles away); Falls of the Rappahannock River (approx. 0.9 miles away); Embrey Dam (approx. 0.9 miles away); The Rappahannock River Runs Free Once More (approx. 0.9 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Fredericksburg.
 
More about this marker. Both sides of the marker display drawing and painting of events of Washington's public life.
 
Also see . . .  Historic Kenmore. Web site of the George Washington Fredericksburg Foundation. (Submitted on December 7, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Politics
 
George Washington<br>Addressing the Constitutional Convention<br>by Junius Brutus Stearns, image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 24, 2013
4. George Washington
Addressing the Constitutional Convention
by Junius Brutus Stearns,
Close-up of image on marker
"Washington, Henry & Pendleton going to the First Congress," <br>Lithograph by Henry Bryan Hall image. Click for full size.
Wikipedia
5. "Washington, Henry & Pendleton going to the First Congress,"
Lithograph by Henry Bryan Hall
Image appears on marker
The Inauguration of George Washington<br>on April 30, 1789 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 24, 2013
6. The Inauguration of George Washington
on April 30, 1789
Close-up of image on marker
Gilbert Stuart's Unfinished 1796 painting of George Washington image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 24, 2013
7. Gilbert Stuart's Unfinished 1796 painting of George Washington
Close-up of image on marker
George Washington Arriving in New York image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 24, 2013
8. George Washington Arriving in New York
Close-up of image on marker
Washington Crossing the Delaware River<br> by Emanuel Leutze image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 24, 2013
9. Washington Crossing the Delaware River
by Emanuel Leutze
Close-up of image on marker
George Washington Directing His Troops image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 24, 2013
10. George Washington Directing His Troops
Close-up of image on marker
Walking Path image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 22, 2008
11. Walking Path
A short walking path between the parking lots includes several waysides advertising the attractions of Fredericksburg.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,056 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   11. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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