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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Salem in Oconee County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Cherokee Path

 
 
The Cherokee Path Marker - Front image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, November 28, 2008
1. The Cherokee Path Marker - Front
Inscription.
[Front Side]:
The main trading path to the Cherokee Nation paralleled the route of Highway 11 for several miles at this point. This section of the path was used by travelers going from Keowee, the main Lower Town of the Cherokees, across the mountains to the Middle and Overhill Towns. The botanist William Bartram left a written account of his journey in 1776.

[Reverse Side]:
In addition to its importance in the indian trade, the path played a military role in the Cherokee War and the Revolution. It linked Fort Prince George (1753) on the Keowee River with Fort Loundon (1756) on the Little Tennessee. Expeditions against the Cherokees were led by Archibald Montgomery in 1760, James Grant in 1761, and Andrew Williamson in 1776.
 
Erected 1973 by S.C. Society, Daughters of the American Colonists. (Marker Number 37-3.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the William Bartram Trails marker series.
 
Location. 34° 53.833′ N, 82° 59.817′ W. Marker is in Salem, South Carolina, in Oconee County. Marker is on Cherokee Foothills Scenic Highway (SC Highway 11). Click for map. Marker is located north east of the intersection of Highway 11 and Little River Road. Marker is in this post office area: Salem SC 29676, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
The Cherokee Path Marker - Reverse image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, November 28, 2008
2. The Cherokee Path Marker - Reverse
At least 10 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Tamassee DAR School (approx. 1.3 miles away); Salem Confederate Monument (approx. 1.5 miles away); Tamassee Town (approx. 3.1 miles away); Jocassee Town (approx. 4.7 miles away); Keowee Town (approx. 5 miles away); Wm. Jennings Bryan Dorn Bridge (approx. 5.2 miles away); Oconee Station / Oconee County (approx. 5.5 miles away); Oconee Town (approx. 5.6 miles away); Cherokee Boundary (1777) (approx. 6.5 miles away); The Oconee Waterwheel (approx. 6.5 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Salem.
 
Also see . . .
1. Cherokee Path. The Cherokee Path (also Keowee path) was the primary route from Charleston to Columbia, South Carolina in Colonial America, connecting all of the Cherokee territories. (Submitted on December 12, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. The Cherokee Path. Trails, fairly unobstructed walkways, were created by migratory animals linking water and food sources which they visited on a regular basis. (Submitted on December 12, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Cherokee Foothills Scenic Highway (SC Highway 11). The Cherokee Foothills Scenic Highway (SC Hwy 11) has designated as Region 1 of the South Carolina Heritage Corridor for much of its length
The Cherokee Path Marker Looking Northeast Along Highway 11 image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, November 28, 2008
3. The Cherokee Path Marker Looking Northeast Along Highway 11
and has been featured by National Geographic Traveler, Rand McNalley, Southern Living and several other national travel publications. (Submitted on December 12, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. South Carolina Highway 11. The Cherokee Foothills National Scenic Highway (S.C. 11) winds its way through the northwest corner of South Carolina. (Submitted on December 12, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. William Bartram. William Bartram (April 20, 1739 — July 22, 1823) was an American naturalist, the son of John Bartram. (Submitted on December 12, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. Bartram's Travels. Bartram's Travels is the short title of naturalist William Bartram's historically significant book describing his travels in the American South and encounters with American Indians between 1773 and 1777. (Submitted on December 12, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

7. Fort Prince George (South Carolina). Fort Prince George (not to be confused with Prince's Fort, which was in use in 1777 and also in South Carolina) was constructed in 1753 in northwest South Carolina, on the Cherokee Path. (Submitted on December 12, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

8. Fort Loudoun. During the French and Indian War (1754-1763) the British
William Bartram image. Click for full size.
4. William Bartram
Colony of South Carolina felt threatened by French activities in the Mississippi Valley. (Submitted on December 12, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraMilitaryNatural ResourcesNotable PersonsPatriots & PatriotismRoads & VehiclesWar, US RevolutionaryWars, US Indian
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,594 times since then and 149 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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