Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Atlanta in Fulton County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Saga of Gold Tooth John

(Or: How the Holiday Inn Central Came To Be)

 
 
The Saga of Gold Tooth John Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, February 18, 2005
1. The Saga of Gold Tooth John Marker
Inscription. First the Cherokee Indians were here.

Then the White settlers were here. Among the first of these was Edwin Plaster who built his home near here. He grew cotton on this plot of land, and built the first permanent bridge across Peachtree Creek. He built a road known as Plasters Bridge Road from his plantation to Decatur Street in Atlanta.

And then the YANKEES were here!

Edwin Plaster went off to war. He returned to find his family scattered, his home burned, his fields devastated. This was wrought by Bill Sherman, the man who occupied and burned Atlanta and its environs (William T. Sherman, General, U.S. Army. The man who was the first to say "War is hell"....and who is said to be the originator of Urban Renewal in Atlanta). Edwin Plaster rebuilt his home across the street from this site.

And then HOLIDAY INN CENTRAL was here!

When grading was started for the construction of Holiday Inn Central, there remained many of the Confederate entrenchments which were built across this site. Much of the decor and design of the Inn is built around the traditions of the area. Meeting rooms are named for Generals John B. Gordon-CSA, J.B. Hood-CSA, James Longstreet-CSA, J.B. McPherson-USA, and William T. Sherman, USA.

Gold Tooth John was the ancient Plaster family handyman who built the old stone steps directly
The Saga of Gold Tooth John Marker from above image. Click for full size.
By Rob Lindsey, December 11, 2015
2. The Saga of Gold Tooth John Marker from above
below this sign. The steps were left standing as a monument to the glorious past. Legend has it that old Gold Tooth John, wearing rumpled old clothes and a set of whiskers, is often seen wandering about the Holiday Inn Central at night -- looking for minnie balls . . . . . . . . .
 
Erected by The (former) Atlanta Holiday Inn Central.
 
Location. 33° 48.658′ N, 84° 22.062′ W. Marker is in Atlanta, Georgia, in Fulton County. Marker is on Piedmont Circle NW 0 miles west of Piedmont Road NE (Georgia Route 237), on the right when traveling west. Click for map. The former Holiday Inn is now the Intown Suites; the marker is at the edge of the parking lot. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1944 Piedmont Circle NE, Atlanta GA 30324, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Wood’s Div. 4th Corps (approx. 0.7 miles away); King's Brigade (approx. ¾ mile away); Between the Peachtree Cr. Forks (approx. 1.2 miles away); Bate’s Division (approx. 1.3 miles away); Wood's & Newton's Divs. at Peachtree Creek (approx. 1.3 miles away); Ward's Div. Crossed Peachtree Creek
Steps from above image. Click for full size.
By Rob Lindsey, December 11, 2015
3. Steps from above
(approx. 1.3 miles away); Stevenson's Division (approx. 1.3 miles away); Site of Old Cheshire Bridge (approx. 1.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Atlanta.
 
Regarding The Saga of Gold Tooth John. Marker is about 10% history and 90% humor. The format is similar to other local markers in Georgia. And there is a little entertainment value to boot. History with a tongue in cheek.
 
Categories. 20th CenturyAntebellum South, USNative AmericansSettlements & SettlersWar, US Civil
 
Front view of steps image. Click for full size.
By Rob Lindsey, December 11, 2015
4. Front view of steps
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 1,764 times since then and 272 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Rob Lindsey of Newnan, Georgia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement