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Buckhannon in Upshur County, West Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Buckhannon / Frontier Days

 
 
Buckhannon Face of Marker Photo, Click for full size
By J. J. Prats, July 15, 2008
1. Buckhannon Face of Marker
Inscription. Buckhannon. Named for chief of Delaware Indians. John Jackson settled near in 1769. John Bush built a fort which was destroyed by Indians, 1782. A settlement which grew up there became the county seat of Harrison. W. Va. Wesleyan College is here.

Frontier Days. To the north stood the giant tree in which Samuel and John Pringle made a home in 1764. In the Heavner Cemetery are the graves of Capt. William White, killed near the fort, and John Fink, killed near here during Indian raids.
 
Location. 38° 59.622′ N, 80° 13.902′ W. Marker is in Buckhannon, West Virginia, in Upshur County. Marker is at the intersection of Main Street and Locust Street, on the right when traveling east on Main Street. Click for map. It is at the courthouse. Marker is in this post office area: Buckhannon WV 26201, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 12 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Destruction at the Courthouse (a few steps from this marker); The History Center (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); McClellan's Buckhannon Camp (approx. half a mile away); Jenkins in Buckhannon
Frontier Days face of Marker Photo, Click for full size
By J. J. Prats, July 15, 2008
2. Frontier Days face of Marker
(approx. 0.8 miles away); The Bassel House (approx. 1.3 miles away); Population Center (approx. 4 miles away); Lorentz (approx. 4.2 miles away); Upshur Militia (approx. 12.1 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Buckhannon.
 
Also see . . .
1. Chieftain Buckongahelas and Son Mahonegon. “The legend has it that Captain William White shot and killed Mahonegon, [Chief Buckongahelas’ (Buckhannon’s) son], in June 1773. The statue [in Jawbone Park] depicts a grief-stricken father holding the body of his dead son, with a bullet hole in the abdomen. The legend also holds that Buckongahelas accomplished revenge, killing White about a decade later.” (Submitted on December 14, 2008.) 

2. A Brief History of West Virginia Wesleyan College. “Many features of modern campus life at Wesleyan have long traditions. An example is football, which was introduced in the pre-college seminary in 1898. The school colors of orange and black go back to that very first game, when fullback and team captain Frank Thompson wore a turtleneck sweater in Princeton University's
Marker at the Upshur County Courthouse Photo, Click for full size
By J. J. Prats, July 15, 2008
3. Marker at the Upshur County Courthouse
orange and black to honor two football greats of that university whom he especially admired. A more comprehensive athletic program was formally organized at the collegiate level in 1902. Early sports included football, baseball, basketball, and gymnastics-all for men only.” (Submitted on December 14, 2008.) 

3. The Pringle Brothers and the Sycamore Tree. Joy Gilchrist’s article. “John and Samuel Pringle followed the Tygart Valley and reached the Buckhannon River country and Turkey Run. They took up residence [in 1764] in a sycamore tree [near the Buckhannon River and Turkey Run] and lived there until Fall 1767 when John went back to the South Branch and learned that the war was over and that they were no longer wanted as deserters.” (Submitted on December 14, 2008.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraNative Americans
 
Buckhannon / Frontier Days Marker Photo, Click for full size
By J. J. Prats, July 15, 2008
4. Buckhannon / Frontier Days Marker
Upshur County Courthouse Photo, Click for full size
By J. J. Prats, July 15, 2008
5. Upshur County Courthouse
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,117 times since then and 60 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Photo(s) of Buckongahelas and His Son Mahonegon sculpture in Jawbone Park • Gravesites of William White an John Fink • Can you help?
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