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Clemson in Pickens County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
The Old Stone Church
The Cemetery
 
Few of the People Buried There Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 28, 2008
1. Few of the People Buried There
 
Inscription.
A Few of the People Interred Here
Buried within the cemetery grounds are people involved in the Indian campaigns of the late Colonial Period, soldiers and patriots of the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, the Indian/Creek War of 1815-16, the Civil War, and all major American wars.

Turner Bynum
The historic intent of some church elders has not always survived to the present. Turner Bynum, the loser in a famous antebellum duel between newspaper editors was denied burial within the graveyard -- being allowed instead to rest outside its walls. With the expansion of the cemetery over the years, he is now near the center.

Jane Lemant Walker
Jane Lemant Walker was born in Ireland. A teenager during the Revolutionary War, she served as a courier for General Thomas Sumter. Walker, a seamstress, carried messages in her double-heeled stockings.

Eliza Huger
according to a long told story, Eliza Huger, a member of a prominent Charleston family, moved to New Orleans. Even by the standards of that city, her actions were considered scandalous. The story tells that Eliza's brother shot her and her lover. Buried within the cemetery was allowed only on the condition that an enclosure be constructed around the site. Her grave lies within high stone walls.

John
 
Some Interred Individuals Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 28, 2008
2. Some Interred Individuals
 
Rusk and Mary Sterritt

Re-marking graves or having special programs to celebrate the life of a particular person buried in the cemetery is common. John Rusk, the builder of the Old Stone church, and his wife Mary Sterritt, were honored in 1936 with new tombstones erected by the State of Texas. This recognized the important role that Thomas Jefferson Ruck played in the history of that state.

Reverend Dr. Thomas Reece and Reverend James McElhenny
Representing the early Presbyterian ministers who served the Hopewell Congregation are the Reverend Dr. Thomas Reece and the Reverend James McElhenny.

Andrew Pickens
General Andrew Pickens, an elder at Old Stone Church, was an Indian fighter and a noted militia leader during the Revolutionary War. He was promoted to the rank of Brigadier General for his role in the Battle of Cowpens. Following the war, he was a United States Commissioner to negotiate treaties with various Indian nations and served as a member of Congress. Pickens District (now Oconee and Pickens Counties) was named for him. Tories repeatedly harassed his wife, Rebecca Pickens, who is also interred in the cemetery.

Colonel Robert Anderson
Colonel Robert Anderson served under Pickens during the Revolution, was a Brigadier General in the state militia following the war, and was a member of the legislature
 
Andrew Pickens Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 28, 2008
3. Andrew Pickens
 
and Lieutenant Governor of South Carolina. He held many other public appointments and served as an elder at the Old Stone Church. Anderson District (now county) was named for him.

Osenappa
One of the oldest graves is that of Osenappa, a Cherokee, who died in 1794. In addition to the marker, a cairn (piled stones) identifies the grave. He is the only Native American buried here. His role in this South Carolina frontier remains undiscovered.

Civil War Soldiers
Over 40 Civil War soldiers are found in the cemetery. Several are members of the Lewis family were in battles in Fredericksburg and Manassas. They are buried together under a unique mini-ball marker.
 
Erected by South Carolina Heritage Corridor.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the South Carolina Heritage Corridor marker series.
 
Location. 34° 39.85′ N, 82° 48.883′ W. Marker is in Clemson, South Carolina, in Pickens County. Marker is on Anderson Highway. Click for map. Marker is near the Old Stone Church. Marker is in this post office area: Clemson SC 29631, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named The Old Stone Church (here, next to this marker); Old Stone Church Confederate Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Old Stone Church / Old Stone Church Graveyard (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Thomas Green Clemson Parkway (approx. 0.6 miles away); Blue Key National Honor Fraternity Gateway (approx. 0.7 miles away); "Widowmaker’s” Drill (approx. ¾ mile away); Hanover House (approx. ¾ mile away); a different marker also named Hanover House (approx. 0.8 miles away); a different marker also named Hanover House (approx. 0.8 miles away); Log House (approx. 0.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Clemson.
 
Robert Anderson, Osenappa, and Civil War Soldiers Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 28, 2008
4. Robert Anderson, Osenappa, and Civil War Soldiers
 

 
Also see . . .
1. Old Stone Church (Clemson). Old Stone Church is a church building built in 1802. (Submitted on December 16, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Old Stone Church and Cemetery. The Old Stone Church is significant architecturally as a masonry adaptation of meeting house architecture and as a representative of the early pioneer church in South Carolina. (Submitted on December 16, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Sites Around Clemson: The Old Stone Church. Located off Highway 76 between Clemson and Pendleton, the Old Stone Church stands as one of the most interesting historical attractions in the Upstate. (Submitted on December 16, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. The Old Stone Church. Document written by Mary Cherry Doyle, Clemson, SC in Jan-1935. (Submitted on December 16, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Old Stone Presbyterian Church Cemetery. It is estimated by Ramsay in his history of South Carolina (1808) that in 1755, there were not even 23 families settled between the Waxhaws on the Catawba River and Augusta on the Savannah River. (Submitted on December 16, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. About the Old Stone Church
Construction of Old Stone Church began in 1797 to replace a log meeting house which was burned. The natural fieldstone rectangular
 
The Old Stone Church Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 28, 2008
5. The Old Stone Church Marker
 
structures with medium gable roof was completed in 1802. Six bays deep with high fenestration, the windows are the size of its doorways. Flat arches with slight radiation of voussoirs are over doors and windows. Exterior stairs lead to slave gallery at rear of church.

Interior is simple, unornamented befitting the period; the wooden benches, raised wooden pulpit, pine floor, hand-hewn exposed beans evident in roof.

Statement of Significance: October 13, 1789, the congregation of Hopewell-Keowee Church asked to be taken into the Presbytery of South Carolina. Church named Hopewell from Treaty of Hopewell (1785) between settlers and Cherokee enacted in part by General Andrew Pickens and Keowee from a branch of the Seneca River. Later called Old Stone Church.

The first building having been destroyed by fire, a new church was built 1797-1802 by John Rusk.

Important politically and militarily for men of prominence instrumental in church's organization and buried in cemetery. Among these are: Revolutionary War Generals Andrew Pickens and Robert Anderson - principle founders and elders; Colonel Andrew Pickens (War of 1812) - elder, Governor of South Carolina.

In the area social/humanitarian, it is noteworthy for the Old Stone Church and Cemetery Commission, organized in the 1890s, which realized the importance of the building itself and
 
The Old Stone Church Marker (Right) with Old Stone Church in Background Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 28, 2008
6. The Old Stone Church Marker (Right) with Old Stone Church in Background
 
its association with distinguished men in South Carolina history. A wall was put around graveyard and repairs made to preserve the old building which had not been used since the 1830s. This Commission remains active in maintaining the church and cemetery.

Importance in religion/philosophy stems from its use as a religious center; the Reverend Thomas Reese, distinguished scholar, patriot, and first South Carolina minister to receive the degree of Doctor of Divinity, who served as pastor 1792-1796; church member "Printer" John Miller, publisher of South Carolina Gazette and Advertizer (Charleston), Junius Letters, and Miller's Weekly Messenger (Pendleton), whose essay "The Influence on Religion in Civil Society" testifies to the quality of South Carolina literature in 1788.

Significant architecturally as representative of the early pioneer church in South Carolina; masonry adaptation of meeting house architecture; built of local materials with outstanding exterior and interior masonry and woodwork craftsmanship. (Source: National Register nomination form.)
    — Submitted July 4, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
 
Entrance to Old Stone Church Cemetery Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 28, 2008
7. Entrance to Old Stone Church Cemetery
 
 
Old Stone Church Cemetery Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 28, 2008
8. Old Stone Church Cemetery
 
 
Old Stone Church Cemetery Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 28, 2008
9. Old Stone Church Cemetery
 
 
Wall Surrounding Grave of Eliza Huger Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 28, 2008
10. Wall Surrounding Grave of Eliza Huger
 
 
Eliza Huger Tombstone Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 28, 2008
11. Eliza Huger Tombstone
Stories vary regarding Huger. Some consider her shunned by the village of Pendleton as a witch and the wall was built to keep her spirit in. Her tombstone is curiously inscribed:

A Brother's Sorrow
dedicated
This marble to the memory
of his Sister
Beneath it are the remains
of
Eliza Huger
whose Spirit returned to
Heaven
 
 
John Rusk Tombstone - Erected by the State of Texas Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 28, 2008
12. John Rusk Tombstone - Erected by the State of Texas
Note the original tombstones for John and Mary Rusk at the base of the newer one.
 
 
Rev. James McElhenny Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 28, 2008
13. Rev. James McElhenny
Sacred
to the Memory of
Rev. James McElhenny
Senior Pastor of the
Presbyterian Church of
Hopewell in
Pendleton District;
who died October 1812
Aged 44 years
 
 
Wall Surrounding the Pickens Family Plot Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 28, 2008
14. Wall Surrounding the Pickens Family Plot
 
 
Gen. Andrew Pickens Tombstone Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 28, 2008
15. Gen. Andrew Pickens Tombstone
Gen. Andrew Pickens
was born
15th September 1739
and died
11th August 1817.
 
 
Rebecca Pickens Tombstone Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 28, 2008
16. Rebecca Pickens Tombstone
 
 
Col. Robert Anderson Tombstone Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 28, 2008
17. Col. Robert Anderson Tombstone
Robert Anderson
South Carolina
Lt. Col.
5 Regt. SC Rangers
Revolutionary War
November 15, 1741
January 3, 1813
 
 
Osenappa Tombstone Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 28, 2008
18. Osenappa Tombstone
 
 
Miller Family Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, November 28, 2008
19. Miller Family Marker
Central Piece:
John Miller
Pioneer Printer and Publisher born in
London England. Died in Pendleton S.C.
1730-1809
An English Gentleman
----------
John Miller 2nd
London England Pendleton S.C.
1770-1828
----------
John Miller 3rd
Pendleton S.C. Bachelors Retreat
1794-1876
----------
In these noble men their wives and their descendants who rest in this sacred soil is this stone lovingly dedicated.
 
 
</b>Here rests the remains of Photo, Click for full size
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, 2009
20. Here rests the remains of
The Rev'd Thomas Reese D.D.
A native of Pennsylvania,
who departed this life
in the hopes of a blessed immortality
in the year of our Lord, 1796
aged 54 years
He was pastor of Salem Church,
Black River, about 20 years.
He was then chosen pastor of
Hopewell & Carmel congregations,
and died a few years after.
Exemplary in all social relations of
life, as a son, husband, father, & citizen.
He lived esteemed and beloved,
and died lamented.
His talents as a writer and preacher
were of a highly respectable grade
and were always directed to promote
the virtue and happiness
of his fellow men.
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on December 15, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 2,081 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on December 15, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   5. submitted on December 16, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6, 7, 8. submitted on December 15, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   9, 10, 11, 12. submitted on December 16, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   13. submitted on December 15, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   14, 15, 16, 17. submitted on December 16, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   18. submitted on December 15, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   19. submitted on December 16, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   20. submitted on March 4, 2009, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
 
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