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Petersburg, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

First Battle of Petersburg

Kautz’s Effort Stopped Here

 

—Lee vs. Grant – The 1864 Campaign —

 
First Battle of Petersburg Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 23, 2006
1. First Battle of Petersburg Marker
Marker indicates the point where a Union cavalry assault against Petersburg was stopped by Confederate cavalry, artillery and a collection of city residents led by James Dearing.
Inscription. In May 1864, Gen. Ulysses S. Grant launched attacks on Confederate armies across the South. He accompanied Gen. George G. Meade’s Army of the Potomac as it fought Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia from the Wilderness to Cold Harbor. With most of both armies still north of the James River, the Federals made their first attempt to capture Confederate-held Petersburg. That effort was stopped here.

On June 9, 1864, Gen. August V. Kautz led 13,000 Union cavalrymen here with orders to capture and burn the city. Petersburg’s Home Guard, 125 old men and young boys, held them off for two hours but finally retreated. The road to Petersburg lay open.

From Bermuda Hundred, 10 miles northeast on the James River, Confederate Gen. James Dearing rushed cavalry and a battery of artillery commanded by Petersburg resident Edward Graham through the city’s streets. Dearing, having formerly served with the famed New Orleans’ Washington Artillery, placed Graham’s guns on the hills on either side of the road and skillfully directed their fire, halting Kautz’s attack. Dearing then led a cavalry charge that drove the Federals away, saving the city for the Confederates that day.

A native of Campbell County, Va., Dearing attended the U.S. Military Academy, resigning to offer his services to his state and the Confederacy. Struck
Battle Map from Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 23, 2006
2. Battle Map from Marker
After breaking through the "old men and youn boys," Kautz's second effort to take Petersburg was stopped here by Confederates along New and Jerusalem Plank Roads.
during the fighting at High Bridge on April 6, 1865, three days before Lee surrendered, he died on April 25, and was the last officer in the Army of Northern Virginia to die from combat wounds.
 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 37° 13.085′ N, 77° 23.597′ W. Marker is in Petersburg, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of Graham Road and West Roy Smith Drive, on the right when traveling west on Graham Road. Click for map. Marker is on Graham Road, across from the entrance to Cameron Field, at a large pullover. Marker is in this post office area: Petersburg VA 23803, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battle of Petersburg (here, next to this marker); Graham Road (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Lest We Forget (approx. half a mile away); Poplar Lawn (approx. half a mile away); a different marker also named Graham Road (approx. half a mile away); Massachusetts (approx. 0.6 miles away); Earliest Known Public High School for African Americans in Virginia
Grave of Gen. James Dearing image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2006
3. Grave of Gen. James Dearing
Gen. James Dearing was the last officer of the Army of Northern Virginia to be killed in battle. He is buried in Spring Hill Cemetery in Lynchburg.
(approx. 0.6 miles away); Battle of the Crater - Covered Way (approx. 0.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Petersburg.
 
More about this marker. The bottom left of the marker contains photographs of Gen. August V. Kautz and Gen. James Dearing. The top center of the marker contains a sketch of the battlefield with the caption “Looking west on New Road (now Graham Road), the route of the June 9, 1864 attack.” A battle map of the June 9, 1864 encounter also appears on the upper right of the marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. June 9, 1864. The Battle of Old Men and Young Boys. The Siege of Petersburg website. (Submitted on December 21, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Civil War Trails – Lee vs. Grant: The 1864 Overland Campaign Tour. Virginia Civil War Trails. (Submitted on December 21, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Notable EventsNotable PlacesWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 2,083 times since then and 149 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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