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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Fargo in Clinch County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Okefenokee Swamp

10 mi. →

 
 
Okefenokee Swamp Marker Photo, Click for full size
By David Seibert, January 10, 2005
1. Okefenokee Swamp Marker
Inscription. Okefenokee, “Land of the Trembling Earth”, was named by its early inhabitants, the Seminole Indians. Acquired by the Federal Government in 1937 for a national wildlife refuge, its more than 600 square miles make it the largest preserved swampland in the country. Fed by rain, small streams and springs, the swamp is 110 to 130 feet above sea level. The pure fresh water of the Okefenokee forms the headwaters of the St. Marys and Suwanee Rivers. The St. Marys flows into the Atlantic Ocean and the Suwanee, immortalized by Stephen Collins Foster, flows into the Gulf of Mexico.
 
Erected 1954 by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker Number 032-3.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 30° 40.524′ N, 82° 33.27′ W. Marker is near Fargo, Georgia, in Clinch County. Marker is at the intersection of U.S. 441 and Georgia Route 94, on the left when traveling south on U.S. 441. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fargo GA 31631, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 1 other marker is within walking distance of this marker. Stephen Collins Foster (approx. 0.6 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
Okefenokee Swamp Marker Photo, Click for full size
By David Seibert, January 19, 2010
2. Okefenokee Swamp Marker
Looking north on US 441 toward Fargo

1. Okefenokee Swamp website. (Submitted on December 28, 2008, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.)
2. Okefenokee Swamp - Wikipedia entry. (Submitted on December 28, 2008, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.)
3. Cracker Farmhouses, 1840 - 1920. The Dog-Trot House: This familiar form of Cracker farmhouse has two pens separated by a central outdoor hall or breezeway. All parts are joined by a common room. A large shade porch spanned the front of the house, and additional porches and rooms, especially a kitchen, were sometimes added at the rear of the house. Chimneys were placed at each gable end of the house. The house was normally raised above grade and had large windows in each of the two front rooms, but lacked a front door. (Submitted on February 22, 2014, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansNatural FeaturesNotable Places
 
Okefenokee Trail Photo, Click for full size
By David Seibert, January 19, 2010
3. Okefenokee Trail
Georgia Highway 177, the Okefenokee Trail, heads into the Okefenokee Swamp from the marker.
Okefenokee Swamp Dog Trot Homestead Photo, Click for full size
By Cosmos Mariner, June 23, 2008
4. Okefenokee Swamp Dog Trot Homestead
Typical "dog trot homestead" style of "cracker farmhouse" house found in the Okefenokee Swamp region and throughout the Deep South. This one is near the marker.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 1,464 times since then and 100 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   2, 3. submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   4. submitted on , by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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