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Chillicothe in Ross County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Quinn Chapel African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) Church

Founded 1821

 

—Historic Underground Railroad —

 
Quinn Chapel African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) Church Marker (Side A) image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., December 21, 2008
1. Quinn Chapel African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) Church Marker (Side A)
Inscription. [Marker Front]:
Methodism was known in Chillicothe as early as 1796. During the early years, 1803-1821, both African American and white Methodists worshipped together in a small brick church, located on the north side of Second Street between Paint and Walnut Streets. This was the first Methodist Church in Chillicothe. Although the African American and white Methodists worshipped and communed together, the African American Methodists were required to occupy the gallery on the north side of the church and were also the last to receive the sacrament of communion. The African American members did not feel they enjoyed equal rights and privileges with their white brethren, although they contributed their share to the spiritual, physical, and financial support of the church.

In 1821 the African American members, led by Rev. Peter James, left the church and formed their own congregation. Rev. William Paul Quinn, who later became Bishop Quinn, organized the new church. Founding members of the church included Peter James (counselor in the Anti-Slavery Society), Harry Hitt,

[Marker Reverse]:
Edward Jackson, Thomas Woodson, Adam Brown, Perry Cowan, Burrell Curtland, Jacob Butcher, George Amos, Ira Ellis, Moses Freeman, Rodger Williams, Elisha Coleman, Edward Brown, and their wives, along with Fanny
Quinn Chapel African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) Church Marker (Side B) image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., December 21, 2008
2. Quinn Chapel African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) Church Marker (Side B)
Diamet, James White, Willie Washington, and Elsey Brown. Thomas Woodson and his family and other members were operators in the Underground Railroad. The congregation placed itself under the leadership of Rev. Richard Allen, of Philadelphia PA and became known as Allenites. Eventually the congregation became known as the African Methodist Episcopal Church.

Their first brick building was erected in 1857 at the present location under the administration of Rev. Samuel Watts. By now the congregation was called Quinn Chapel A.M.E. Church. The present building was constructed in 1910 under the pastorate of Rev. W. E. Walker. The Chillicothe congregation is the oldest A.M.E. church in Ohio and the first A.M.E. church organized west of the Allegheny Mountains.
 
Erected by The Members of Quinn Chapel A.M.E. Church and The Friends of Freedom/Ohio Underground Railroad Association.
 
Location. 39° 19.951′ N, 82° 59.247′ W. Marker is in Chillicothe, Ohio, in Ross County. Marker is on Main Street (U.S. 50), on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 181 W. Main Street, Chillicothe OH 45601, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Abrams' Big House (about 800 feet away, measured in a direct
Quinn Chapel African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) Church and Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., December 21, 2008
3. Quinn Chapel African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) Church and Marker
line); First Court of Ross County (about 800 feet away); The Chillicothe Gazette (approx. 0.2 miles away); Dard Hunter (approx. 0.2 miles away); Historic Site in Journalism (approx. 0.2 miles away); A Replica of Ohio's First Capitol (approx. 0.2 miles away); Donald E. McHenry (approx. ¼ mile away); Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Ohio (approx. ¼ mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Chillicothe.
 
Categories. Abolition & Underground RRAfrican AmericansCharity & Public WorkChurches, Etc.Civil RightsHeroesNotable PersonsNotable PlacesSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 1,815 times since then and 83 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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