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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Petersburg, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fort Wadsworth

 
 
Fort Wadsworth Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 22, 2008
1. Fort Wadsworth Marker
Inscription. Built following the Battle of the Weldon Railroad in August 1864, Fort Wadsworth anchored the extreme left of the Union siege lines for more than a month. It secured the the Union grip on the Petersburg & Weldon Railroad - a major Confederate supply line.

The fort's size reflects its importance during August and September of 1864. Duty here was easier than in the works on the right of the line; the closest Confederates were nearly a mile away.
 
Erected by Petersburg National Battlefield - National Park Service - U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 37° 10.033′ N, 77° 24.98′ W. Marker is in Petersburg, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of Halifax Road (County Route 604) and Flank Road (County Route 676), on the right when traveling south on Halifax Road. Click for map. Located in the Fort Wadsworth unit of the Petersburg National Battlefield. Marker is in this post office area: Petersburg VA 23805, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Siege of Petersburg—Grant's Fourth Offensive (here, next to this marker); Fight for the Weldon Railroad (here, next to this marker); Hagood’s Brigade
Markers at the Fort Wadsworth Parking Area image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
2. Markers at the Fort Wadsworth Parking Area
(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Petersburg Railroad (approx. 1.2 miles away); Fort Conahey (approx. 1.7 miles away); Fort Hays (approx. 2.1 miles away); Siege of Petersburg—Grant's Fifth Offensive (approx. 2.1 miles away); The Largest Fort (approx. 2.1 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Petersburg.
 
More about this marker. In the main section of the marker, the background is a sketch captioned, Immediately after securing the railroad on August 18, 1864, the Federals started digging works to protect it. In the upper portion of the sketch is an inset showing a plan of the fort. Fort Wadsworth was designed to resist an attack from any direction and included four large bastions mounting up to three guns each. This sketch, also shows a grave located on the east parapet of the fort.

On the right is a map of the siege lines. For most of August and September 1864, Fort Wadsworth anchored the left flank of the Union siege lines. An inset is captioned, Union possession of the Petersburg & Weldon Railroad forced the Confederates to haul supplies
Southeast Bastion of Fort Wadsworth image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 22, 2008
3. Southeast Bastion of Fort Wadsworth
by wagon 17 miles from Stony Creek Station into Petersburg.

 
Also see . . .  Battle and Siege of Petersburg. National Park Service site. (Submitted on December 24, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 
Interior of Fort Wadsworth image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 22, 2008
4. Interior of Fort Wadsworth
Exterior Moat on Northeast Side of Fort Wadsworth image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 22, 2008
5. Exterior Moat on Northeast Side of Fort Wadsworth
The train in the background is running along the modern site of the Railroad. At the time of the war, the railroad ran just east of the fort location, closely paralleling the Halifax Road.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,901 times since then and 170 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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