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Durham in Durham County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Brassfield Station

A Path Both Traveled

 

—Carolinas Campaign —

 
Brassfield Station Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, February 5, 2013
1. Brassfield Station Marker
Inscription.
(Preface): The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the “March to the Sea.” Sherman's objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to crush Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. Scattered Confederate forces consolidated in North Carolina, the Confederacy's logistical lifeline, where Sherman defeated Gen. Joseph E. Johnston's last-ditch attack at Bentonville. After Sherman was reinforced at Goldsboro late in March, Johnston saw the futility of further resistance and surrendered on April 26, essentially ending the Civil War.

Union forces occupied Raleigh on April 13, as Gen. H. Judson Kilpatrick pursued retreating Confederates. The next day, moving through Durham, he split his cavalry forces, sending Gen. Smith D. Atkins, leading the second brigade, west through present-day southern Durham. At New Hope Creek, Atkins engaged in the last picket skirmish of the war. Kilpatrick accompanied Gen. Thomas J. Jordan’s and Col. Michael Kerwin’s brigades as they trailed a band of Confederates north along the North Carolina Railroad past Brassfield Station here, meeting little resistance. The Federals rode on to Durham’s Station, where Kilpatrick made his headquarters at the nearby home of Dr. Richard Blacknall.

Brassfield
Brassfield Station Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, August 18, 2006
2. Brassfield Station Marker
Station stood in a rural area of hills and dales dotted by pine trees and wildlife in 1865. According to the 1860 census, it was home not only white farmers but also to 528 free African Americans, making for an unusually diverse community. Many free blacks lived, worked, and worshiped alongside whites in Durham during the antebellum years.

(Sidebar): Post-Civil War Durham became known for the popularity of its “brightleaf” smoking tobacco. The city soon became a commercial center with the South’s first denim mill and the world’s largest hosiery manufacturer. Agriculture and manufacturing, although still important, have given way to a creative-class economy based on education, health care, pharmaceutical research, and bioinformatics. Less than a century after Union cavalrymen pursued retreating Confederates past Brassfield Station, thousands of acres here were incorporated into Research Triangle Park in 1959.
 
Erected by North Carolina Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the North Carolina Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 35° 55.686′ N, 78° 50.671′ W. Marker is in Durham, North Carolina, in Durham County. Marker is on S Miami Blvd. (North Carolina Route 1959), on the right when
Brassfield Station Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, February 5, 2013
3. Brassfield Station Marker
traveling north. Click for map. Marker is on the north side of Durham Fire Station #13, on S Miami Blvd. between Brassfield Road and Brunson Road. Marker is in this post office area: Durham NC 27703, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Rural Credit Union (approx. 3.1 miles away); North Carolina Central University (approx. 4.3 miles away); John Merrick (approx. 4.3 miles away); Bull City Blues (approx. 4.8 miles away); Durham's Station (approx. 5.6 miles away); North Carolina (approx. 5.6 miles away); John Sprunt Hill (approx. 5.6 miles away); Black Wall Street (approx. 5.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Durham.
 
More about this marker. The left of the marker features a photograph of Gen. H. Judson Kilpatrick - Courtesy Library of Congress. The upper right of the marker features a picture of a “Civil War-era train from North Carolina Railroad Company letterhead - Courtesy North Carolina Railroad Company. There is also a photograph of Durham, ca. 1880 - Courtesy of Durham County Library, Durham, N.C. next to the sidebar.
 
Also see . . .  Civil War Traveler. North Carolina Civil War Trails. (Submitted on December 26, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
Brassfield Station Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, February 5, 2013
4. Brassfield Station Marker
 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,357 times since then and 95 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   2. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3, 4. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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