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Near Petersburg in Dinwiddie County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Battle of White Oak Road

The Battle of Lewis Farm

 
 
The Battle of Lewis Farm Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 22, 2006
1. The Battle of Lewis Farm Marker
Inscription. General Grant wanted to force his way around the Confederate right flank and cut the last remaining supply lines into Petersburg. The offensive began on March 29, 1865. Union Major General Philip H. Sheridan’s cavalry moved towards Dinwiddie Court House, about five miles southwest of here, to lure the Confederates out of their defensive works and to cut one of the Confederate army’s main supply lines: the South Side Railroad. At the same time an infantry corps under Major General Gouverneur K. Warren and Major General Andrew A. Humphreys was ordered to the Boydton Plank Road. From there the corps was to advance towards this point and prevent Confederate reinforcements from reaching Dinwiddie Court House by keeping them occupied here.

The weather was miserable. Through heavy rains, the Federal columns waded across rising streams and marched through thick vegetation. “We went slipping and plunging through the black slimy mud in which pointed rocks were bedded,” one Union soldier complained, “now stumbling over the stiffening corpse of some poor comrade by whose side we might soon lie.”

Brigadier General Joshua L. Chamberlain’s brigade led the Federal advance. As Chamberlain’s men approached Gravelly Run about 2½ miles southeast of here, they met with Confederate resistance. Just over
Civil War Preservation Trust image. Click for more information.
2. Civil War Preservation Trust
one mile after the Federals forded the waist-high stream they reached the Lewis Farm. A member of the 198th Pennsylvania recalled, “General Chamberlain made his disposition for attack … the brigade advanced at a double-quick and soon was enveloped in the terrible fire of the securely posted Confederates … Our troops were not allowed to deliver fire until they came into close quarters, when the engagement became very severe, our troops being again and again checked, but renewing the assault with increased impetuosity.”

Confederate Lieutenant General Richard Anderson deployed his troops to blunt Chamberlain’s advance, but the Confederates could not hold against the superior Federal numbers. Anderson soon ordered his men to retire to the entrenchments along White Oak Road. The Federals had suffered 381 casualties, including Chamberlain, who was wounded; the Confederates lost 370 men.
 
Erected by Civil War Preservation Trust.
 
Location. 37° 9.117′ N, 77° 32.926′ W. Marker is near Petersburg, Virginia, in Dinwiddie County. Marker can be reached from White Oak Road, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is located on a walking trail that starts from the parking lot of the White Oak Road Battlefield. Marker is in this post office area: Petersburg VA 23803, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
The Battle of White Oak Road Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 22, 2006
3. The Battle of White Oak Road Marker
The Confederate entrenchments along White Oak Road can be seen in this photo behind the marker.
At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named The Battle of White Oak Road (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of White Oak Road (within shouting distance of this marker); White Oak Road Engagement (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named The Battle of White Oak Road (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named The Battle of White Oak Road (about 600 feet away); a different marker also named The Battle of White Oak Road (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named The Battle of White Oak Road (approx. 0.2 miles away); Gravelly Run Quaker Meeting House (approx. 1.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Petersburg.
 
More about this marker. The bottom of the marker features a photograph of “Brigadier General Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, hero of the Little Round Top at Gettysburg, commanded a brigade under General Gouverneur K. Warren.” The right side of the marker contains a battle map of the Battle of Lewis Farm.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Virtual Tour by Markers of the White Oak Road Battlefield. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .
The Battle of White Oak Road Walking Trail image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 22, 2006
4. The Battle of White Oak Road Walking Trail
"The Battle of Lewis Farm" marker can be seen in this photo on the walking trail. The trail begins at the parking lot of the White Oak Road Battlefield.

1. White Oak Road. The Civil War Siege of Petersburg. (Submitted on December 28, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Saving America’s Threatened Civil War Battlefields. Civil War Preservation Trust. (Submitted on December 28, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Notable EventsNotable PlacesWar, US Civil
 
The Battle of Lewis Farm Battle Map from Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 22, 2006
5. The Battle of Lewis Farm Battle Map from Marker
The Battle of White Oak Road Trail Map image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 22, 2006
6. The Battle of White Oak Road Trail Map
The location of the "Battle of Lewis Farm" marker indicated on this walking trail map.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 2,271 times since then and 166 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   2. submitted on .   3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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