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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Rantowles in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Stono Rebellion (1739)

 
 
The Stono Rebellion Marker, front side Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, November 15, 2008
1. The Stono Rebellion Marker, front side
Inscription. (Marker Front)
The Stono Rebellion, the largest slave insurrection in British North America, began nearby on September 9, 1739. About 20 Africans raided a store near Wallace Creek, a branch of the Stono River. Taking guns and other weapons, they killed two shopkeepers. The Rebels marched south toward promised freedom in Spanish Florida, waving flags, beating drums, and shouting "Liberty!"

(Marker Reverse)
The rebels were joined by 40 to 50 more during their 15~mile march. They killed at least 20 whites, but spared others. The rebellion ended late that afternoon when militia caught the rebels, killing at least 34 of them. Most who escaped were captured and executed; any forced to join the rebels were released. The S.C. assembly soon enacted a harsh slave code, in force until 1865.
 
Erected 2006 by The Sea Island Farmers Cooperative. (Marker Number 10-48.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 32° 47.111′ N, 80° 8.83′ W. Marker is in Rantowles, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is on Savannah Highway (U.S. 17), on the right when traveling south. Click for map.
The Stono Rebellion Marker, reverse side Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, November 2008
2. The Stono Rebellion Marker, reverse side
Marker is just south side of the Wallace River. Marker is in this post office area: Hollywood SC 29449, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Grave Of Colonel William A. Washington (approx. one mile away); Belvidere School Site (approx. 2.1 miles away); St. Paul's, Stono / St. Paul's Churchyard (approx. 3.3 miles away); Plainsfield Plantation (approx. 5 miles away); Champneys' Pink Cluster (approx. 5.6 miles away); Drayton Hall / Drayton Family (approx. 6.7 miles away); South Carolina Canal & Rail Road Company (approx. 6.7 miles away); St. Andrew’s Parish Church (approx. 6.7 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. Stono's Rebellion , Library of Congress. (Submitted on December 26, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.)
2. The Stono Rebellion (sometimes called Cato's Conspiracy or Cato's Rebellion). (Submitted on December 26, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.)
3. South Carolina Department of Archives and History. Contains a little history on the Stono Rebellion. It also list the entry into the National Historic Landmarks as 1974. (Submitted on October 26, 2009, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina.) 

4. The Stono Rebellion page on the National Historic Landmark website. (Submitted on October 26, 2009, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina.)
The Stono Rebellion Marker, looking south on US 17 Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, November 15, 2008
3. The Stono Rebellion Marker, looking south on US 17

 
Additional keywords. Jemmy
 
Categories. African AmericansColonial EraNotable Events
 
The Stono Rebellion Marker, looking north on US 17 Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, November 2008
4. The Stono Rebellion Marker, looking north on US 17
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 7,434 times since then and 770 times this year. Last updated on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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