Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Aldie in Loudoun County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Aldie Mill

 
 
Aldie Mill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 4, 2007
1. Aldie Mill Marker
Inscription. In the 1800s and early 1900s Aldie Mill reverberated with the rhythmic sounds of waterwheels, millstones, and farmers chatting with the miller about the weather and their crops. Charles Fenton Mercer located the grist mill here to capitalize on nearby sources of grain, the waters of Little River, and a network of roads. The Little River Turnpike (U.S. 50), connecting Aldie with the port of Alexandria, was nearly finished. And less than a mile to the west the highway would hook up with turnpikes through Ashby's Gap and the Snicker's Gap in the Blue Ridge. Ideally located, Aldie Mill turned Loudoun County's bountiful wheat harvest into flour for markets along the east coast and overseas.
 
Erected by Virginia Outdoors Foundation.
 
Location. 38° 58.518′ N, 77° 38.492′ W. Marker is in Aldie, Virginia, in Loudoun County. Marker is on John S. Mosby Highway (U.S. 50), on the right when traveling east. Click for map. The marker is in the parking lot for the Aldie Mill Historic Site. Marker is in this post office area: Aldie VA 20105, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Battle of Aldie (within shouting distance of this marker); Lee Moves North Again
Merchant Mill Building image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 4, 2007
2. Merchant Mill Building
(within shouting distance of this marker); Mercer’s Home (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Snickersville Turnpike (approx. 0.7 miles away); a different marker also named Battle of Aldie (approx. 0.7 miles away); Mother of Stonewall Jackson (approx. one mile away); President Monroe’s Home (approx. one mile away); A Revolutionary War Hero (approx. 1.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Aldie.
 
Also see . . .
1. National Parks Service article on Aldie Mill. (Submitted on June 30, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
2. Northern Virginia Parks Authoriy Site on Aldie Mill. (Submitted on June 30, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
3. Virginia Wind article on Aldie Mill. (Submitted on June 30, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
4. Time stands still at Old Aldie Mill. (Submitted on June 30, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
 
Additional comments.
1. Invoicing the old way.....
From “Time Stands Still at the Old Aldie Mill,” by the Waterford Historical Society:
The
Waterwheels image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 4, 2007
3. Waterwheels
miller asked the boy tolling the grain, ‘Whose wheat is that?’
‘Mr. Fairfax’s, sir.’
‘Did you toll him?’
‘Yes, sir.’
‘Well, toll him again. He's a rich man and can afford it.’
Next day the miller came upon the boy and asked:
‘Whose cornmeal is that?’
‘Mr. Jones’s, sir.’
‘Did you toll him?’
‘Yes, sir.’
‘Well, toll him again. He’s a poor man; let’s keep him poor.’

The “miller’s toll” was a portion of the milled grain set aside by the miller in lieu of payment. —Ed.
    — Submitted June 30, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

 
Categories. AgricultureIndustry & CommerceNotable Buildings
 
Country Mill Building image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 4, 2007
4. Country Mill Building
The Water Trace and Overshot Wheels image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 29, 2007
5. The Water Trace and Overshot Wheels
Waterpower System image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 29, 2007
6. Waterpower System
This interpretive marker details the water system used to power the mill. The water that powers the two waterwheels - and, in turn, the millstones - comes from a millpond almost two-thirds of a mile away at the western end of Aldie, to your left. Slaves probably dug the millrace and built wooden gates and wooden flume in the headrace. After powering the merchant mill's pair of overshot wheels, the water flowed through the tailrace and turned the country mill's wheel before rejoining the Little River north of the highway. Today, Aldie's merchant mill is the last standing gristmill in Virginia with tandem overshot waterwheels.
The Milling Complex image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 4, 2007
7. The Milling Complex
This interpretive marker details the buildings that make up the mill. Starting in 1807, slaves fired the bricks, built the mill structures you see here, dug trenches for the millrace, and then served as mill workers. Little cash passed between the farmers and the miller. Farmers brought their corn and wheat here to be ground into finished products. The miller paid for the farmer's grain or took a portion of the grain or flour for commercial use.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,015 times since then and 33 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement