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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Doswell in Hanover County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

North Anna River Campaign

21-26 May 1864

 
 
North Anna River Campaign Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 21, 2007
1. North Anna River Campaign Marker
Inscription. Approaching Richmond from the north after the Wilderness Campaign, Lt. General U.S. Grant sought to cross the North Anna River and capture the critical rail center at Hanover Junction (Doswell). General R. E. Lee ordered the construction of a complex web of earthworks here to defend the river crossing and junction. The Union army probed the defenses and captured some of them but soon abandoned the effort and moved east toward Cold Harbor.
 
Erected 1990 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number EA 1.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Battlefield Trails - Civil War marker series.
 
Location. 37° 52.782′ N, 77° 27.9′ W. Marker is in Doswell, Virginia, in Hanover County. Marker is on Washington Highway (U.S. 1), on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is on Route 1, 2/3 mile south of the Hanover-Caroline County line. Marker is in this post office area: Doswell VA 23047, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Lafayette and Cornwallis (approx. 0.6 miles away); North Anna River (approx. 0.6 miles away); Caroline County / Hanover County (approx.
Confederate Earthworks Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 21, 2007
2. Confederate Earthworks
These earthworks, located in the North Anna Battlefield Park, were defended by Confederate troops during the North Anna River Campaign.
0.8 miles away); Lee and Grant (approx. 0.8 miles away); Long Creek Action (approx. one mile away); Hanover Junction (approx. 1.3 miles away); a different marker also named Hanover Junction (approx. 1.4 miles away); Artillery Duel (approx. 1.5 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Doswell.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. The North Anna Campaign by Markers.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
North Anna River Campaign Marker on US Rt 1 (facing north) Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, April 9, 2009
3. North Anna River Campaign Marker on US Rt 1 (facing north)
Hanover Junction Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 21, 2007
4. Hanover Junction
This railroad junction was the objective of the Federal assault of May 21 through 26, 1864.
Telegraph Road (wartime trace) Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, April 9, 2009
5. Telegraph Road (wartime trace)
Fox House "Ellington" circa 1830. Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, April 9, 2009
6. Fox House "Ellington" circa 1830.
"Ere long the enemy's artillery opened against the bridgeheads, and the Confederates answered. General Lee happened at the time to be in the yard of Ellington, the home of the Fox family, overlooking the river. The owner, W. E. Fox, came up and invited the General into the house. Lee thanked him and said that he would be there only a few minutes. Mr. Fox thereupon pressed him to take some refreshment. Again the General declined, but seeing that Mr. Fox's hospitality was offended, he added that if Mr. Fox had any buttermilk, he would be glad to have a glass. Mr. Fox insisted that the General take a seat on the porch, and hurried off to bring the milk and some stale bread, which was all he had. He brought the pitcher and the plate and set them before Lee. The General poured out the milk and was in the act of drinking it when a Federal battery, whose commander evidently had seen a uniform on the porch, fired a round shot. It passed within a few feet of the General and imbedded itself in the door-frame, where the marks may be seen to this day. To Mr. Fox's amazement, the General finished his milk as if nothing had happened, thanked his host and then rode quickly away, lest his presence provoke a bombardment of the house." Douglas Southall Freeman. R.E. Lee: A Biography. 1934
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,455 times since then and 109 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.   4. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   5, 6. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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