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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Glendale in Henrico County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Willis Church Parsonage

The Confederates Move Toward Malvern Hill

 

—Malvern Hill Battlefield – Richmond Nat'l Battlefield Park —

 
Willis Church Parsonage Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
1. Willis Church Parsonage Marker
Inscription. Frustrated by his failure at Glendale, Robert E. Lee gathered his army on July 1, 1862, for a final effort to destroy the Union army. But on this day, unlike his previous efforts during the Seven Days, Lee did not have a Union flank or a strung-out marching column to attack. Before him stood the powerful Union rear guard, arrayed on the plateau of Malvern Hill, about a half mile in front of you.

The Willis Church parsonage (the ruins behind you) became an important landmark on July 1. Before the attacks, division commander D.H. Hill met with his officers near the house. Colonel W. Gaston Meares of North Carolina was killed by a shell in the yard. Confederate artillery attempted to take position in nearby fields. Lee watched from a blacksmith shop that stood across the Willis Church from you.
 
Erected by Association for the Preservation of Civil War Sites, Inc.
 
Location. 37° 25.118′ N, 77° 14.827′ W. Marker is in Glendale, Virginia, in Henrico County. Marker is on Willis Church Road 0.2 miles from Carter Mills Road, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is located in the Malvern Hill Battlefield Unit of the Richmond National Battlefield Park. Marker is in this post office area: Henrico VA 23231, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Malvern Hill - CWPT image, Click for more information
2. Malvern Hill - CWPT
Civil War Preservation Trust's efforts to preserve portions of the battlefield.
Click for more information.
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Gathering Storm (here, next to this marker); Battle Commences (a few steps from this marker); Methodist Parsonage (within shouting distance of this marker); Malvern Hill Trail (within shouting distance of this marker); Twilight Action (within shouting distance of this marker); The Battle of Malvern Hill (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Infantry Against Infantry (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named The Battle of Malvern Hill (about 700 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Glendale.
 
More about this marker. The bottom left of the marker contains a picture of the Willis Church Parsonage with the caption, “The Parsonage, as it appeared in 1885, was the home of the pastor of the Willis Church. On July 1, 1862, the house stood in plain view of the Union artillery on Malvern Hill. Fire destroyed the parsonage in 1988. (Drawing from Battles and Leaders.) Next to this is a picture of the church with the caption, “The Willis Church is shown here as it appeared shortly after the war. For weeks after the battles in this area the church served as a field hospital. The current church stands on the site of the wartime structure, about a mile north of here. (Drawing from Battles and Leaders.) The right of the marker
Malvern Hill Hiking Trail Map from Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
3. Malvern Hill Hiking Trail Map from Marker
features a map of a hiking trail of the Malvern Hill Battlefield that passes the site of the marker. It has a caption of “From here a 2 mile trail leads to Malvern Hill, tracking the route of Confederate attacks during the last of the bloody Seven Days battles. The map depicts the open and wooded areas as they appeared in 1862.”
 
Also see . . .
1. Malvern Hill. CWSAC Battle Summaries. (Submitted on January 1, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Malvern Hill Battlefield Podcast. National Park Service website. (Submitted on January 1, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Willis Church Parsonage Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, March 21, 2010
4. Willis Church Parsonage Marker
Marker at Willis Church Parsonage Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
5. Marker at Willis Church Parsonage
The marker is located in front of the ruins of the Willis Church Parsonage.
Willis Church Parsonage Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
6. Willis Church Parsonage
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,237 times since then and 79 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   2. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5, 6. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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