Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Third Brigade

First Division - Fifth Corps

 

—Army of the Potomac —

 
Third Brigade Tablet Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, July 24, 2008
1. Third Brigade Tablet
Note the Maltese Cross of the Fifth Corps at the top of the Tablet.
Inscription.
Army of the Potomac
Fifth Corps First Division
Third Brigade

Col. Strong Vincent, Col. James C. Rice
20th. Maine, 16th. Michigan, 44th. New York
83d. Pennsylvania Infantry
July 2 After 4 p.m. moved with the Division left in front to the support of Third Corps line. The Brigade was detached and took position on Little Round Top advancing to the crests at the south and southwest. The 20th Maine, 83d Penna., 44th New York and 16th Michigan took position from left to right. They were immediately attacked by Brig. Gen. Law's Brigade and the contest raged for over two hours and until dark when the attack was repulsed with great loss in killed wounded and prisoners. Over 500 prisoners including 15 commissioned officers were captured. The 20th Maine and the 83d Penna. extended their lines after dark to the summit of Round Top.

July 3 Took position about noon with Second Brigade near the left centre of the main line of battle and remained in reserve through the day exposed to severe shelling but without loss.

July 4 Made a reconnoissance to the front without finding any Confederate forces in positions occupied by them the previous day.

Casualties. Killed 6 Officers 83 Men. Wounded 17 Officers 236 Men. Captured or missing 11 men. Total 353.
 
Erected
Third Brigade Tablet Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, July 24, 2008
2. Third Brigade Tablet
1912 by Gettysburg National Military Park Commission.
 
Location. 39° 47.449′ N, 77° 14.199′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is on Sykes Avenue, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Located at stop 8, Little Round Top, on the driving tour of Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. "Hold The Ground At All Hazards" (a few steps from this marker); Gen. Strong Vincent (within shouting distance of this marker); The Tenacious 20th Maine (within shouting distance of this marker); Historic Breastworks (within shouting distance of this marker); 12th and 44th New York Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); Col. Strong Vincent (within shouting distance of this marker); 83rd Pennsylvania Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); 140th New York Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Little Round Top. National Park Service virtual tour stop. (Submitted on January 2, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Reports of Col. James C. Rice. Col. James Rice, 44th New York assumed command after Vincent
South-West Side of Little Round Top Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, July 24, 2008
3. South-West Side of Little Round Top
Looking from the 14th / 44th New York Monument at the south crest of Little Round Top. In the distance where Warren Avenue intersects Sickles Avenue is the Devil's Den. Vincent's Brigade arrived on this side of Little Round Top just as elements of Law's and Robertson's Confederate Brigades began ascending the slopes here. Some of the most difficult fighting occurred in this open area. The stone walls are breastworks erected by the Federals during and after the fighting. The 16th Michigan Infantry monument along the breastworks indicates a position held after the repulse of the Confederate attack. The distance to the Devil's Den from this point is just over 300 yards.
was mortally wounded. Of the desperate fighting on Little Round Top, Rice wrote:
To effect this object the enemy made every effort. Massing two or three brigades of his force, he tried for an hour in vain to break the lines of the Forty-fourth New York and Eighty-third Pennsylvania, charging again and again within a few yards of these unflinching troops. At every charge he was repulsed with terrible slaughter. Despairing of success at this point, he made a desperate attack upon the extreme right of the brigade, forcing back a part of the Sixteenth Michigan. This regiment was broken, and, through some misunderstanding of orders, explained in the official report of the commanding officer, it was thrown into confusion; but being immediately supported by the One hundred and fortieth New York Volunteers, the line became again firm and unbroken.
Rice included a map of the position in his report. (Submitted on January 2, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 759 times since then and 81 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement