Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Law's Brigade

Hood's Division - Longstreet's Corps

 

—Army of Northern Virginia —

 
Law's Brigade Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, November 11, 2008
1. Law's Brigade Marker
Inscription.
Army of Northern Virginia
Longstreet's Corps Hood's Division
Law's Brigade

4th. 15th. 44th. 47th. 48th. Alabama Infantry
July 2 Arrived on the Field about 4 p.m. and advanced against the Union positions. The 4th, 15th, and 47th Regiments attacked Little Round Top and continued assault until dark. The 44th and 48th assisted in capturing the Devil's Den and 3 guns of Smith's 4th New York Battery.
 
Erected 1910 by Gettysburg National Military Park Commission.
 
Location. 39° 47.372′ N, 77° 14.239′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is at the intersection of Warren Avenue and Sykes Avenue, on the left when traveling west on Warren Avenue. Click for map. Located between Little and Big Round Tops in Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 9th Pennsylvania Reserves (a few steps from this marker); 83rd Pennsylvania Infantry (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); 10th Pennsylvania Reserves (about 300 feet away); Twentieth Maine (about
Law's Brigade Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, November 11, 2008
2. Law's Brigade Marker
300 feet away); Third Brigade (about 400 feet away); 9th Massachusetts Infantry (about 400 feet away); The Tenacious 20th Maine (about 400 feet away); "Hold The Ground At All Hazards" (about 500 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Law's Brigade at Gettysburg.
 
Also see . . .  Little Round Top. National Park Service virtual tour stop. (Submitted on January 2, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Advance of the 47th Alabama Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, November 11, 2008
3. Advance of the 47th Alabama
Looking from the intersection of Wright Avenue (which becomes Warren Avenue) and Sykes Avenue, which runs up the slope of Little Round Top to the right. The 47th Alabama advanced up the hill through this section of wooded boulders on the west (left) of the Avenue. The 4th Alabama was on their left, away from the camera. The 15th Alabama was to the right of the 47th, along or east of modern Sykes Avenue. As the battle developed, the 15th would swing wider to the east.
Oates' 15th Alabama and the Rock Ledge Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, November 11, 2008
4. Oates' 15th Alabama and the Rock Ledge
Looking east from a foot path near the 20th Maine Monument (east of Sykes Avenue). As the 15th Alabama moved to the southeast side of Little Round Top, it encountered the 20th Maine, which was at that time the left flank of the Federal army. In his after action report Oates stated, "I halted my regiment as its left reached a very large rock, and ordered a left-wheel of the regiment...taking advantage of a ledge of rocks, running off in a line perpendicular to the one I had just abandoned...." While the exact spot of the large rock is indeterminate, the boulders here are part of the ledge Oates referred to. The 15th was then facing up hill (toward the camera) at the refused left flank of the Maine regiment.
The 4th Alabama's Advance Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, November 11, 2008
5. The 4th Alabama's Advance
Looking south, down the slope of Little Round Top. The intersection of Warren and Sykes Avenues is in the upper left of frame. In the far center is the Law Brigade tablet beside Warren Avenue. The 4th Alabama, with the 5th Texas on their left, struggled up the slopes here. A metal post in the foreground, just in front of the stone breastworks, is all that remains of a marker to either the 18th or 22nd Massachusetts Infantry Regiment (likely the 18th). Both were broken off many years ago.
Rock Formation Splits the 44th Alabama Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, November 8, 2008
6. Rock Formation Splits the 44th Alabama
This rock formation, sometimes called Benning's Knoll, at the south end of the Devil's Den actually split the 44th Alabama's advance into two wings. Part of the regiment advanced along Plum Run (to the left). The other wing advanced up the southwest face of the Devil's Den. This served to weaken their assault on the Federal positions. The 48th Alabama stayed in the woods at the base of Big Round Top (in the background) before reaching the Slaughter Pen and confronting the 4th Maine Infantry.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,067 times since then and 62 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   6. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement