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Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

“Hold The Ground At All Hazards”

Colonel Strong Vincent & Colonel Joshua Chamberlain at Little Round Top on July 2nd, 1863.

 

—July 2, 1863 - The Second Day —

 
"Hold The Ground At All Hazards" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 24, 2008
1. "Hold The Ground At All Hazards" Marker
Inscription. On the afternoon of July 2, 1863 Union General Gouverneur K. Warren found Little Round Top undefended. He quickly sent his staff to find troops to defend this vital position. General George Sykes, commanding the 5th Corps, agreed to send a brigade to occupy the hill. Sykes' orders were intercepted by Colonel Strong Vincent, commanding the Third Brigade, First Division, Fifth Corps. Without waiting for approval from his commanding officer, Vincent, "took the responsibility of taking my brigade there," to Little Round Top.

Riding ahead of his troops, Vincent ascended this hill and selected the ground where his brigade would make its defense. Vincent personally placed each of his four regiments. He entrusted his left flank to Colonel Joshua L. Chamberlain's 20th Maine. Vincent's orders to Chamberlain were to "hold the ground at all hazards." Within minutes of forming his line, Vincent's brigade was assaulted by Confederate regiments of Law's and Robertson's brigades. A desperate battle ensued across the entire brigade line. The line held, but the cost was high, including Vincent, who was mortally wounded.
 
Erected by Gettysburg National Military Park.
 
Location. 39° 47.443′ N, 77° 14.187′ W. Marker is near
20th Maine and Vincent's Spur Trailhead image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 24, 2008
2. 20th Maine and Vincent's Spur Trailhead
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is on Sykes Avenue, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Located at the start of trail extending from the Little Round Top pull off to the 20th Maine monument in Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Third Brigade (a few steps from this marker); The Tenacious 20th Maine (a few steps from this marker); Gen. Strong Vincent (within shouting distance of this marker); 83rd Pennsylvania Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); Historic Breastworks (within shouting distance of this marker); 12th and 44th New York Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); Col. Strong Vincent (within shouting distance of this marker); 140th New York Infantry (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
More about this marker. The marker features a painting depicting Vincent and Chamberlain on Little Round Top. Colonel Strong Vincent, using his wife's riding crop, indicates to Colonel Joshua L. Chamberlain the area that Chamberlain's 20th Maine is to defend. In the foreground, the 20th Maine is moving at the double-quick, while Confederate artillery fire bursts around them.
 
Also see . . .
Center of the 20th Maine Position image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 11, 2008
3. Center of the 20th Maine Position
Colonel Vincent posted the 20th Maine on the southeast spur off Little Round Top. As the 15th Alabama attempted to sweep around Chamberlain's line, the 20th Maine extended and refused the line. The final position of the regiment in this defense resembled a "V" more than a line.

1. Little Round Top. National Park Service virtual tour stop. (Submitted on January 2, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Report of Col. Joshua L. Chamberlain. Concerning his orders, Chamberlain wrote:
The enemy's artillery got range of our column as we were climbing the spur, and the crashing of the shells among the rocks and the tree tops made us move lively along the crest. One or two shells burst in our ranks. Passing to the southern slope of Little Round Top, Colonel Vincent indicated to me the ground my regiment was to occupy, informing me that this was the extreme left of our general line, and that a desperate attack was expected in order to turn that position, concluding by telling me I was to" hold that ground at all hazards." This was the last word I heard from him. (Submitted on January 2, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,908 times since then and 298 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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