Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Mechanicsville in Hanover County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Battle of Gaines’ Mill

 
 
The Battle of Gaines’ Mill Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
1. The Battle of Gaines’ Mill Marker
Inscription. Although victorious at Beaver Dam Creek on June 26, 1862, Union General George B. McClellan believed Stonewall Jackson’s 25,000 Confederates threatened the Union right flank. The next morning, June 27, McClellan ordered Fitz John Porter’s Fifth Corps to retire from its position behind Beaver Dam Creek toward the Chichahominy and continue with the rest of the Union army to the James River. McClellan’s decision signaled the end of offensive operations against Richmond. He had surrendered the initiative to Robert E. Lee.

Porter’s Union soldiers reached this plateau by mid-morning of June 27th. They faced west and north, occupying a two mile front on this high ground overlooking Boatswain’s Creek. Porter’s defense shielded the army’s retreat which had already started on the other side of the Chickahominy River. The river is just one mile behind you to the south. Lee’s assault against this line would begin about 2:00 pm.

Follow this loop trail to visit the scenes of some of the heaviest fighting of the Battle of Gaines’ Mill.
 
Erected by Richmond National Battlefield Park - National Park Service.
 
Location. This marker has been replaced by another marker nearby. It was located near 37° 34.455′ N, 77° 17.447′ 
Markers at Gaines’ Mill Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
2. Markers at Gaines’ Mill
There are several markers at this location. The Battle of Gaines’ Mill marker is to the left in this photo.
W. Marker was in Mechanicsville, Virginia, in Hanover County. Marker was on Watt House Road (Virginia Route 718), on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in the Gaines’ Mill Battlefield Unit of Richmond National Battlefield Park. Marker was in this post office area: Mechanicsville VA 23111, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Gaines' Mill (here, next to this marker); Seven Days Battles (a few steps from this marker); The Watt House (within shouting distance of this marker); Springfield Plantation (within shouting distance of this marker); Lee’s First Victory: At a Huge Cost (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Gaines' Mill (within shouting distance of this marker); Confederate Pursuit (within shouting distance of this marker); Union Artillery (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line). Click for a list of all markers in Mechanicsville.
 
More about this marker. The upper right of the marker contains a picture of the Ruins of Gaines’ Mill. It has a caption of “The battle fought here on June 27, 1862 goes by several names. It most commonly is called the Battle of Gaines’ Mill. The actual grist mill from which the battle took its name is actually more than a mile northwest of here and was destroyed in 1864 by Union cavalry as
Gaines’ Mill Battlefield Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
3. Gaines’ Mill Battlefield
Union Maj. Gen. Fitz John Porter placed his troops at this location to cover the retreat of the rest of the Army of the Potomac.
shown in this sketch by Lt. Robert Sneden of the 40th New York infantry.” The bottom right of the marker features a picture of New Cold Harbor Tavern with the caption “Some Confederates called the 1862 battle ‘Cold Harbor’ because the center of their line was at New Cold Harbor Tavern, shown in this sketch drawn in 1865 by Lt. Sneden. Robert E. Lee watched most of the battle from the yard of the tavern, which stood less than a mile north of here. Old Cold Harbor Tavern marked the far east end of the battlefield, nearly two miles from here. Most references to the Battle of Cold Harbor pertain to the June 1864 battle that was fought over this same ground. These rare images are provided courtesy of the Virginia Historical Society.” The center of the marker contains a map of the Road to Gaines’ Mill.

This marker was replaced by a new one named Battle of Gaines' Mill (see nearby markers).
 
Also see . . .
1. Gaines’ Mill. CWSAC Battle Summaries website. (Submitted on January 3, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Places To Go in Richmond National Battlefield Park. National Park Service website. (Submitted on January 3, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

3. The Seven Days Battle. HistoryCentral.com website. (Submitted on January 3, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
Gaines’ Mill Battlefield Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
4. Gaines’ Mill Battlefield
The June 27, 1862 battle reached its climax at this site, overlooking the Boatswain Creek.
 

4. Gaines' Mill Battlefield Loop Trail. This marker is one along the loop trail in the Gaines' Mill Battlefield unit of the Richmond National Battlefield Park. (Submitted on February 26, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 

5. Gaines' Mill Podcast. 8-stop, 1.5-mile walking tour narrated by NPS historian, Robert Krick. (Submitted on February 27, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Richmond National Battlefield Park Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
5. Richmond National Battlefield Park
Marker is in the Gaines’ Mill Battlefield Unit of Richmond National Battlefield Park.
"The Road to Gaines’ Mill" Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
6. "The Road to Gaines’ Mill"
While Porter occupied the high ground north of the Chickahominy, Lee spread his own army out in pursuit.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,847 times since then and 77 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement