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Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

4th Maine Infantry

2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 3rd Corps

 
 
4th Maine Infantry Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 8, 2008
1. 4th Maine Infantry Monument
Note the red diamonds, faintly showing, on each of the five sides of the monument shaft. The red diamond was the symbol of the 1st Division, Third Corps.
Inscription. (Front):
4th Maine
Infantry
Colonel Elijah Walker

(Left Front Facing):
3d Corps. 1st Division.
2d Brigade.

(Left Rear Facing):
22 killed and died
38 wounded
56 missing

(Right Rear Facing):
Erected by the
State of Maine

(Right Front Facing):
In remembrance
of our casualties
July 2d, 1863

 
Erected 1888 by State of Maine.
 
Location. 39° 47.512′ N, 77° 14.485′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is at the intersection of Sickles Avenue and Warren Avenue, on the right when traveling south on Sickles Avenue. Click for map. Located in the Devils Den section of Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Devil's Den and the Slaughter Pen (within shouting distance of this marker); 99th Pennsylvania Infantry (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Attack on Devil's Den (about 300 feet away); 4th New York Independent Battery (about
Front of Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 8, 2008
2. Front of Monument
300 feet away); 40th New York Infantry (about 300 feet away); Smith's New York Battery (about 400 feet away); The Fight for Devil's Den (about 400 feet away); Robertson's Brigade (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Also see . . .  Devil's Den. National Park Service virtual tour stop. (Submitted on January 5, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Left Front Facing image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 8, 2008
3. Left Front Facing
Left and Right Rear Facings image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 8, 2008
4. Left and Right Rear Facings
Right Front Facing image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 8, 2008
5. Right Front Facing
4th Maine Infantry Right Flank image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 8, 2008
6. 4th Maine Infantry Right Flank
Looking from the right flank marker toward the monument. This flank marker is an example of an unfortunately common issue plaguing those studying the battle by way of markers. The flank markers were placed during the 1880s onward based on some general initial battle lines, and sometimes do not conform with the actual locations of the heaviest fighting. The 4th Maine was at first posted across the crest of the Devil's Den, then moved into a "refuse" line anchored on Plum Run. However, that line was well in advance of this flank marker.
Refuse Position image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 8, 2008
7. Refuse Position
Looking from "Elephant Rock" back toward the Devil's Den and Plum Run valley. The 4th Maine deployed south into the very rough between Plum Run and the Devil's Den (left) outcroppings. As seen in the photograph, the Devil's Den is always a popular stop for visitors.
The 4th Maine Recapture Smith's Guns image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 8, 2008
8. The 4th Maine Recapture Smith's Guns
Looking from the top of Devil's Den to the north at the ground behind Smith's guns (out of frame to the left). Col. Walker, seeing Smith's battery about to be overrun, and without waiting for orders, pulled back from his advance refuse position. He then ordered a "right oblique" and charged to the top of the ridge. The assault drove back portions of the 1st Texas Infantry and, temporarily at least, recaptured Smith's guns. The monument atop the ridge here is the 99th Pennsylvania.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 958 times since then and 111 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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