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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hanging Rock in Roanoke County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Hanging Rock Coal Trestle

Hanging Rock Battlefield Trail

 
 
The Hanging Rock Coal Trestle Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Kevin W., December 28, 2008
1. The Hanging Rock Coal Trestle Marker
Inscription. The Hanging Rock coal trestle functioned as a coal unloading facility, and was built by the Norfolk and Western Railway in 1943 from a standard plan used for this type of structure.

At the turn of the century, most industries utilized a self-contained boiler plant that heated water for steam radiator systems and also provided hot water for hygiene and cooking. Coal was the essential fuel for such systems.

In many cases, coal was delivered directly to the consumer by hopper carloads. The alternative to direct delivery was the transloading facility, of which the Hanging Rock coal trestle is an example. Here the coal was unloaded from the rail car to be trucked to the final destination.

With the advent of oil and natural gas heating systems, coal is now used primarily for the generation of electric power. Most coal is handled in “unit trains” bound for a single destination. The days of single carload coal sales are practically gone due to the significantly higher costs of handling.

The Hanging Rock coal trestle stands as a fine example of a rapidly disappearing piece of American history.
 
Erected 1999 by County of Roanoke, the City of Salem, and the Hanging Rock Battlefield and Railway Preservation Foundation.
 
Location.
Norfolk and Western Railway Standard Timber Coal Trestle Photo, Click for full size
By Kevin W., December 28, 2008
2. Norfolk and Western Railway Standard Timber Coal Trestle
Detail of picture on the marker.
37° 19.545′ N, 80° 2.542′ W. Marker is in Hanging Rock, Virginia, in Roanoke County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Thompson Memorial Drive (Virginia Route 311) and Kessler Mill Drive. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Salem VA 24153, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. McCausland Attacks (within shouting distance of this marker); Two Future Presidents In Wartime Retreat (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Battle of Hanging Rock (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named The Battle of Hanging Rock (approx. 0.2 miles away); George Morgan Jones (approx. 0.2 miles away); United Daughters of the Confederacy Monuments (approx. 0.2 miles away); Hanging Rock Battlefield Trail (approx. 0.2 miles away); Hanging Rock (approx. 0.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Hanging Rock.
 
More about this marker. Marker is one of several interpretive signs along the cinder-surfaced, 1.7-mile long Hanging Rock Battlefield Trail that winds along Mason Creek and Kessler Mill Road in Salem, Virginia.
 
Categories. Railroads & Streetcars
 
The Hanging Rock Coal Trestle Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Kevin W., December 28, 2008
3. The Hanging Rock Coal Trestle Marker
The Coal Trestle, almost completely hidden by brush, is behind the marker.
The Hanging Rock Coal Trestle, end view Photo, Click for full size
By Kevin W., December 28, 2008
4. The Hanging Rock Coal Trestle, end view
This view, taken from Electric Road, is on the trestle's opposite end from the marker.
The Hanging Rock Coal Trestle Photo, Click for full size
By Kevin W., December 28, 2008
5. The Hanging Rock Coal Trestle
The Hanging Rock Coal Trestle Photo, Click for full size
By Kevin W., December 28, 2008
6. The Hanging Rock Coal Trestle
One of the Hanging Rock Coal Trestle Hoppers Photo, Click for full size
By Kevin W., December 28, 2008
7. One of the Hanging Rock Coal Trestle Hoppers
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,499 times since then and 64 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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