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Near Fairfax in Fairfax County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Battle of Ox Hill

The Attack and Death of General Stevens

 
 
The Attack and Death of General Stevens Marker Photo, Click for full size
January 10, 2009
1. The Attack and Death of General Stevens Marker
Inscription. Acting to protect Pope’s line of retreat along the Warrenton Turnpike, Brigadier General Isaac Stevens, commanding the 1st Division, IX Corps, seized the initiative and ordered an attack. With storm clouds threatening and artillery fire booming overhead, Steven’s infantry moved briskly in three lines across the Reid lane and up the slope toward the woods. As Stevens’ first line came within 200 yards of the woods, Captain Lusk of the 79th New York “Highlanders” shouted, There is no enemy there! They have fallen back!” Instantly, the concealed Confederates opened a withering fire from behind a rail fence bordering the woods, and from across the cornfield.

The blast staggered the Union line, decimating the front rank. Captain Hazard Stevens, the general’s son, was shot in the hip and arm. Yet the Highlanders and the 28th Massachusetts returned fire as best they could. To bolster the faltering attack, Stevens extended his line, ordering the 50th Pennsylvania forward into the cornfield with the 8th Michigan, 100th Pennsylvania and 46th New York in support.

Confederate fire intensified as General A.P. Hill ordered Gregg’s South Carolina brigade up to the cornfield. Determined to rally his wavering troops, Stevens seized the colors of the 79th New York and, rushing forward with the uplifted flag, called
The Attack and Death of General Stevens Marker Photo, Click for full size
January 10, 2009
2. The Attack and Death of General Stevens Marker
out to his old regiment, “Highlanders! My Highlanders! Follow your general!” The whole line responded and charged up the slope into a hail of gunfire.

As he neared the rail fence (directly ahead of you), Stevens was shot in the head and fell with the flag draping his body. The heavens then opened. Lightning streaked the sky, thunder crashed and heavy winds drove sheets of rain. The Highlanders surged over Stevens’ lifeless body and the fence, driving Hays’ Louisiana brigade back through the woods.
 
Erected 2008 by Fairfax County Park Authority.
 
Location. 38° 51.876′ N, 77° 22.228′ W. Marker is near Fairfax, Virginia, in Fairfax County. Marker can be reached from West Ox Road (Virginia Route 608). Click for map. Located at the first trail stop wayside at the Ox Hill Battlefield Park Interpretive Trail. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4134 West Ox Road, Fairfax VA 22033, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named The Battle of Ox Hill (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Ox Hill (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Ox Hill
Battle Map on Marker Photo, Click for full size
January 10, 2009
3. Battle Map on Marker
September 1, 1862 • 4:30 - 5:15 pm
(within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Ox Hill (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Ox Hill (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Ox Hill (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Ox Hill (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Ox Hill (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Fairfax.
 
More about this marker. On the upper left of the marker is a portrait captioned, Gen. Isaac I. Stevens, USA Photograph taken at Beaufort, SC, ca. February, 1862. On the lower left of the marker is a painting captioned, Attack at Chantilly—Death of General Stevens From original painting by Alonzo Chappel, ca. 1860s. On the right side of the marker is a battle map.
 
Also see . . .
1. Isaac Stevens Biography. (Submitted on January 10, 2009.)
2. The Battle of Chantilly. Civil War Preservation Trust (Submitted on January 10, 2009.) 

3. The Death of General Stevens. “A Last Salute” (Submitted on January 10, 2009.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on . This page has been viewed 1,077 times since then and 68 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on . • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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