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Near Fairfax in Fairfax County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Battle of Ox Hill

Boulders and Quartz Stone

 

—The Spot Where General Stevens Fell —

 
Boulders and Quartz Stone Marker Photo, Click for full size
January 10, 2009
1. Boulders and Quartz Stone Marker
Inscription. The boulders and quartz stone beside this fence mark the location where Union General Isaac Stevens fell with the flag of the 79th New York “Highlanders” during the initial Union assault. Here, Stevens’ troops threw down the fence and drove Hay’s Louisiana brigade back through the woods.

In 1883, Hazard Stevens, the general’s son and adjutant, and Charles Walcott of the 21st Massachusetts, returned to this field and identified the places where generals Stevens and Kearny were killed. The farm was then owned by Confederate veteran John Ballard, who marked the spot where General Stevens fell with a mound of boulders and later added a white quartz stone.

In 1915, Ballard’s son would say of his father and this stone,

“…an ex-Confederate maimed in that
great struggle, with weak hands but with
a heart strong in respect for a brave fallen
foeman, planted that stone to mark that spot…
with no services other than the reverence one
brave man has for another.”

 
Erected 2008 by Fairfax County Park Authority.
 
Location. 38° 51.912′ N, 77° 22.208′ W. Marker is near Fairfax, Virginia, in Fairfax County. Marker can be reached from West Ox
Marker on the Battle of Ox Hill Battlefield Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 18, 2014
2. Marker on the Battle of Ox Hill Battlefield
The boulder and quartz stone can be seen beside the fence in the background.
Road (Virginia Route 608). Click for map. Located at the fifth trail stop wayside at the Ox Hill Battlefield Park Interpretive Trail. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4134 West Ox Road, Fairfax VA 22033, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named The Battle of Ox Hill (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Ox Hill (a few steps from this marker); Maryland (Antietam / Sharpsburg) Campaign (within shouting distance of this marker); Battle of Ox Hill (Chantilly) (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Ox Hill (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Ox Hill (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Ox Hill (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Ox Hill (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Click for a list of all markers in Fairfax.
 
More about this marker. The left side of the marker features a sketch of John Ballard. On the right side of the marker is a photo captioned, Quartz Stone on the spot where Gen. Isaac Stevens was killed at Chantilly. Photograph from the Washington
Boulders and Quartz Stone Marker Photo, Click for full size
January 10, 2009
3. Boulders and Quartz Stone Marker
Sunday Star, November 13, 1921.

 
Also see . . .
1. Chantilly Battlefield. From Rantings of a Civil War Historian Blog (Submitted on January 10, 2009.) 

2. The Battle of Chantilly. Civil War Preservation Trust (Submitted on January 10, 2009.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Close-up of Photo on Marker Photo, Click for full size
January 10, 2009
4. Close-up of Photo on Marker
The Modern Setting Photo, Click for full size
January 10, 2009
5. The Modern Setting
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on . This page has been viewed 1,085 times since then and 86 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on .   2. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3, 4, 5. submitted on . • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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