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Near Fairfax in Fairfax County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Battle of Ox Hill

Aftermath: The Invasion of Maryland

 
 
Aftermath: The Invasion of Maryland Marker image. Click for full size.
January 10, 2009
1. Aftermath: The Invasion of Maryland Marker
Inscription. The clash at Ox Hill ended the Second Manassas Campaign. A small force of 6,000 Union soldiers had battled to a stalemate a much larger Confederate force of 17,000 of whom about 10,000 were engaged. In little more than two hours, the Confederates lost 516 men killed, wounded and missing. Union forces lost at least 1,000 casualties and withdrew during the night to Jermantown and Fairfax Court House, leaving behind nearly 250 severely wounded. The next day Pope’s army escaped to the safety of Washington’s fortifications.

After the battle, Major General James Longstreet’s wing arrived at Chantilly. With Lee’s army now united, the Confederates held their position and rested on September 2, their camps sprawling from Ox Hill to Chantilly and beyond.

On September 3, Lee marched his army to Dranesville, then to Leesburg and the Potomac River fords. There, on September 4, the Army of Northern Virginia began crossing into Maryland.

The invasion of Maryland would draw the Union army out of Virginia and move the war to Union territory, where fertile fields could be foraged and where promise of further victories might bring European recognition and support for the Confederacy. The opposing armies would soon clash again in the bloody battles of South Mountain and Antietam (Sharpsburg).
 
Erected
Aftermath: The Invasion of Maryland Marker image. Click for full size.
January 10, 2009
2. Aftermath: The Invasion of Maryland Marker
2008 by Fairfax County Park Authority.
 
Location. 38° 51.864′ N, 77° 22.175′ W. Marker is near Fairfax, Virginia, in Fairfax County. Marker can be reached from West Ox Road (Virginia Route 608). Click for map. Located at the ninth trail stop wayside at the Ox Hill Battlefield Park Interpretive Trail. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4134 West Ox Road, Fairfax VA 22033, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named The Battle of Ox Hill (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Ox Hill (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Ox Hill (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Ox Hill (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Ox Hill (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Ox Hill (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named The Battle of Ox Hill (about 300 feet away); a different marker also named The Battle of Ox Hill (about 300 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Fairfax.
 
More about this marker. On the upper middle middle
Close-up of Map on Marker image. Click for full size.
January 10, 2009
3. Close-up of Map on Marker
of the marker is a sketch captioned, “Jackson’s men wading the Potomac at White’s Ford.” Engraving from Battles and Leaders, Vol. II, 1887. The left side of the marker is a map depicting Confederate and Union troop movements. The map is captioned,

On September 2, Pope’s Union army retreated toward the fortifications of Washington, pursued and harassed by Stuart’s cavalry. On September 3, Lee’s Confederate army began its movement to Dranesville and Leesburg. The combined movements of both armies (more than 120,000 troops with artillery and wagon trains) clogged nearly every available road.

At fords near Leesburg, the Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac over a period of four days, September 4-7. The Confederates would occupy Frederick, Maryland, September 6-10.

 
Also see . . .
1. The Battle of Chantilly. Civil War Preservation Trust (Submitted on January 10, 2009.) 

2. The Battle of Ox Hill (Chantilly). “A Last Salute” (Submitted on January 10, 2009.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on . This page has been viewed 1,181 times since then and 104 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on . • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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