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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Dover in Tuscarawas County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

The Ohio and Erie Canal / Canal Dover Toll House

1825 - 1913

 
 
The Ohio and Erie Canal Marker (Side A) Photo, Click for full size
By William Fischer, Jr., December 22, 2008
1. The Ohio and Erie Canal Marker (Side A)
Inscription.
The Ohio-Erie Canal
1825-1913
Seeking an alternate transportation route to distant markets, many farmers and manufacturers in Ohio wanted to connect the Ohio River to Lake Erie with a canal. Beginning in Cleveland the Ohio-Erie Canal ran south, the length of the state, to Portsmouth. The canal was a total of 308 miles long, 40 feet wide at the surface, and 4 feet deep. The Ohio-Erie Canal opened for traffic along its entire length in 1832 and consequently effected great change. Population along the canal increased, and commercial, political, and industrial growth in Ohio boomed. Products grown and manufactured in this previously isolated region now had access to world markets. Profits for farmers and merchants increased, and the entire state economy was bolstered. With the rise of railroads in the 1860s, however, canals were destined to become obsolete because the railroad was a faster and more dependable means of transportation. The canal system ceased to operate altogether after a disastrous flood in 1913.

The Ohio-Erie Canal
Canal Dover Toll House
Strategically located along the entire length of the Ohio-Erie Canal were eleven toll houses at Cleveland, Akron, Massillon, Canal Dover, Roscoe, Newark, Carrol, Circleville, Waverly, and Portsmouth. Each canal boat was required
The Ohio and Erie Canal Marker (Side B) Photo, Click for full size
By William Fischer, Jr., December 22, 2008
2. The Ohio and Erie Canal Marker (Side B)
to pay a toll or fee for use of the canal. The per-mile rate of the toll was usually in the form of pennies or mills, per weight or container. The Canal Dover Toll House was situated just east of this location between the canal and the Tuscarawas River.
 
Erected 1995 by The Tuscarawas County Historical Society and The Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 5-79.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio and Erie Canal, and the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection marker series.
 
Location. 40° 31.132′ N, 81° 28.566′ W. Marker is in Dover, Ohio, in Tuscarawas County. Marker is on Front Street, on the left when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is about 300 feet east of Tuscarawas Avenue, along the Tuscarawas River. Marker is in this post office area: Dover OH 44622, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Dover Concert Band, 1924 (approx. 0.2 miles away); Christian Deardorff (approx. mile away); W. W. Scott, 1891 (approx. mile away); Camp Meigs (approx. 0.4 miles away); Jeremiah E. Reeves / The J.E. Reeves Victorian Home (approx.
The Ohio and Erie Canal Map on Marker Photo, Click for full size
By William Fischer, Jr., December 22, 2008
3. The Ohio and Erie Canal Map on Marker
mile away); Reeves Steel World War II Memorial (approx. mile away); Al Maloney (approx. 2.2 miles away); C. William "Bill" Kidd (approx. 2.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Dover.
 
Categories. DisastersIndustry & CommerceWaterways & Vessels
 
The Ohio and Erie Canal Marker Photo, Click for full size
By William Fischer, Jr., December 22, 2008
4. The Ohio and Erie Canal Marker
Tuscarawas Avenue Bridge in background.
The Ohio and Erie Canal Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Wintermantel, March 15, 2015
5. The Ohio and Erie Canal Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Fort Scott, Kansas. This page has been viewed 2,174 times since then and 68 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Fort Scott, Kansas.   5. submitted on , by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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