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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

1st Corps Headquarters

Army of the Potomac

 

—Major General Abner Doubleday —

 
1st Corps Headquarters Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 1, 2008
1. 1st Corps Headquarters Marker
A breach down 4.5-inch Siege Rifle was used to indicate the Corps headquarters. A bronze disk, the circle or moon shape of the First Corps symbol, was fixed on the cannon, but is missing now.
Inscription.
Army of the Potomac
1st. Corps Headquarters
Major General
Abner Doubleday
July 1, 1863

Were located 230 yards S.E.
from here, near the pike

 
Erected 1913 by Gettysburg National Military Park Commission.
 
Location. 39° 50.134′ N, 77° 14.976′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is on Reynolds Avenue, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Located on the First Day Battlefield, north of McPherson Woods, in Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 8th Illinois Cavalry (within shouting distance of this marker); First Division (within shouting distance of this marker); First Corps (within shouting distance of this marker); First Brigade (within shouting distance of this marker); Battery L, 1st New York Light Artillery (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); 143d Pennsylvania Infantry (about 400 feet away); The Battle Opens (about 400 feet away); Monuments and Markers (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. McPherson's Ridge
Close Up of the Plaques image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 1, 2008
2. Close Up of the Plaques
. National Park Service virtual tour stop. (Submitted on January 11, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Reports of Maj. Gen. Abner Doubleday. Doubleday was in command of the Corps as Reynolds was commanding a "wing" of the Army. When Reynolds was killed in McPherson Woods, Doubleday had command of the field, at least for a short time. In his report, he explains the reasons for defending the ground north and west of Gettysburg:
There were abundant reasons for holding it, for it is the junction of seven great roads leading to Hagerstown, Chambersburg, Carlisle, York, Baltimore, Taneytown, and Washington, and is also an important railroad terminus. The places above mentioned are on the circumference of a circle of which it is the center. It was, therefore, a strategic point of no ordinary importance. Its possession would have been invaluable to Lee, shortening and strengthening his line to Williamsport, and serving as a base of maneuvers for future operations. (Submitted on January 11, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Doubleday's Headquarters Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 5, 2010
3. Doubleday's Headquarters Marker
This view of the 1st Corp Headquarters marker looks east, towards the town of Gettysburg. The cannon that marks the site of Lee's headquarters during the battle can be seen in the background to the right.
1st Corps Headquarters Monument image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 23, 2015
4. 1st Corps Headquarters Monument
Looking Southeast from the Headquarters Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 1, 2008
5. Looking Southeast from the Headquarters Marker
Doubleday maintained a headquarters behind the lines, but in position to observe the action across the southern part of the First Corps front.
Markings on the Cannon image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 1, 2008
6. Markings on the Cannon
Most of the markings on the 4.5-inch Rifle are on the muzzle, which is clearly out of reach. However, the foundry would stamp its own number on the right rimbase (over the trunnion). Here the number "1308" allows positive identification of this piece as one cast by the Fort Pitt Foundry, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1863. The fixture over the rimbase is a bracket for a sight post.
Looking North on Reynolds Avenue image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 1, 2008
7. Looking North on Reynolds Avenue
The headquarters marker is just south of the intersection of Reynolds Avenue and Chambersburg Pike.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,148 times since then and 173 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on July 17, 2016.
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