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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Monuments and Markers

 
 
Monuments and Markers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 1, 2008
1. Monuments and Markers Marker
Inscription.
"The world will little note, nor long remember, what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here."
President Abraham Lincoln
Gettysburg Address

To ensure that succeeding generations would remember and understand what happened at Gettysburg, veterans of the battle, federal and state governments, and interested organizations erected more than 1,300 monuments, memorials, and markers on the battlefield.

Interest in monuments gained momentum in the 1880s, especially among Union veterans. Eventually, every Union regiment that fought here erected at least one monument.

Gettysburg's monuments are noted for their elegant bronze and stone sculpture, and for their unique and varied designs. More valuable, perhaps, is the information they offer about the soldiers and their positions, actions, and casualties - information based on soldiers' personal experiences.

Wayside Exhibits
Modern wayside exhibits describe historic features and events at tour stops.

War Department Markers
By 1912, the United States War Department had placed more than 350 tablets and markers on the battlefield to explain the roles of specific military units. Accounts given are factual and non-judgmental. Among the War Department markers are the four distinctive types illustrated here.

Headquarters
Monuments and Markers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 23, 2015
2. Monuments and Markers Marker
Markers
are distinguished by cannon tubes pointed skyward. They mark headquarters locations of Union and Confederate army commanders (Generals Meade and Lee) and their corps commanders.

Battery Tablets describe the actions of artillery batteries. Union batteries normally contained six guns. Confederate batteries four guns.

Confederate Brigade Markers (round bases) describe the positions and actions of Confederate brigades. A brigade contained about 1,600 men, or 4-6 regiments.

Union Brigade Markers (square bases) describe the positions and actions of Union brigades. A brigade contained about 1,500 men or 4-5 regiments.

State Memorials
Confederate and Union state memorials commemorate all the soldiers from a particular state. Several of these memorials, like the Virginia Memorial shown here, feature bronze sculpture.

Bronze Statues
Generals and other notable persons associated with the battle are commemorated with bronze sculptures.

Regimental Monuments
Most numerous on the battlefield, regimental monuments commemorate state and U.S. Regular Army regiments (300-400 men) and batteries. These monuments are normally placed at the center of a regiment's line of battle.

Pennsylvania and New York placed the most regimental monuments with 123 and 108 respectively.
Monuments and Markers Marker<br>Main Text image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 23, 2015
3. Monuments and Markers Marker
Main Text
Confederate regiments erected few monuments at Gettysburg.

Flank Marker Look to the left and right of regimental monuments for small stones marking the regiment's flanks or ends.
 
Erected by Gettysburg National Military Park.
 
Location. 39° 50.077′ N, 77° 15.021′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is on Reynolds Avenue, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Located at the east end of McPherson Woods in Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Battle Opens (here, next to this marker); Battery L, 1st New York Light Artillery (a few steps from this marker); First Brigade (within shouting distance of this marker); Major Gen. John F. Reynolds (within shouting distance of this marker); Third Division (within shouting distance of this marker); First Division (within shouting distance of this marker); 151st Pennsylvania Infantry (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); 8th New York Cavalry (about 400 feet away); 1st Corps Headquarters (about 400 feet away); 8th Illinois Cavalry (about 500 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
More about this marker.
Monuments and Markers Marker<br>War Department Markers image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 23, 2015
4. Monuments and Markers Marker
War Department Markers
The marker displays examples of the various types of monuments and markers discussed in the text. In the lower left is a sketch of a wayside exhibit. Under the War Department Markers section are photos of a headquarters marker, a battery tablet, and the two types of brigade markers. In the center are photos of the Virginia State Memorial, Major General Winfield S. Hancock's equestrian statue, and Father William Corby's bronze statue. On the right, a photo shows Survivors of the 23rd Pennsylvania Infantry at the dedication of their monument on Culp's Hill, August 1886. Battle veterans assisted with the design, placement, and funding of monuments. Below the photo are examples of regimental monuments - the 96th Pennsylvania Infantry, 93rd New York Infantry, and 1st Maryland Infantry, U.S. Beside the memorials is an example of a flank marker.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Monuments and Markers Marker<br>State Memorials image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 23, 2015
5. Monuments and Markers Marker
State Memorials
Monuments and Markers Marker<br>Regimental Monuments image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 23, 2015
6. Monuments and Markers Marker
Regimental Monuments
Waysides at McPherson's Woods image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 1, 2008
7. Waysides at McPherson's Woods
The "Markers and Monuments" on the left, "The Battle Opens" on the right.
Monuments and Markers Marker (left) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 23, 2015
8. Monuments and Markers Marker (left)
How Many Types Do You See? image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2008
9. How Many Types Do You See?
How many types of the markers and monuments can you pick out from this view on Cemetery Ridge?
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,024 times since then and 125 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   7. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   8. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   9. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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