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Mechanicsville in Hanover County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Union Position

Cold Harbor - 1864

 
 
Union Position Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
1. Union Position Marker
Inscription. The night before, Union soldiers write their names on scraps of paper fastened to their clothing, hoping to be identified after the battle.

At 4:30 a.m. they are ordered to attack the Confederate earthworks clearly visible across the open field. Most of the dying is over in thirty minutes. Unable to advance or retreat, the surviving Federals use spoons, forks, or bayonets to dig in where they lie, beneath a waist-high ceiling of fire.

Afterward the Union Army built the more elaborate entrenchments behind you. Ten days later, in secrecy, Grant abandoned the position to march on Petersburg.
 
Erected by Richmond National Battlefield Park - National Park Service.
 
Location. This marker has been replaced by another marker nearby. It was located near 37° 35.492′ N, 77° 17.177′ W. Marker was in Mechanicsville, Virginia, in Hanover County. Marker was on Anderson Wright Drive, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is on the tour road in the Cold Harbor Unit of Richmond National Battlefield. Marker was in this post office area: Mechanicsville VA 23111, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Grant's Grand Assault (within shouting distance of this marker); Union Earth Works
Marker on the Cold Harbor Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
2. Marker on the Cold Harbor Battlefield
The Confederate earthworks can still be seen from the Union position.
(about 800 feet away, measured in a direct line); Confederate Fortifications (about 800 feet away); Between the Lines (approx. 0.2 miles away); In Reserve (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Cold Harbor Killing Fields (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Waters Ran Red (approx. 0.2 miles away); A Lethal Occupation (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Mechanicsville.
 
More about this marker. The lower left of the marker contains a picture of Union soldiers setting up camp. The right side of the marker features a picture of a field of dead and dying soldiers, with the caption “Seven thousand killed and wounded soldiers lay in the blistering sun between the trenches. ’Vain calls for relief smote upon the ears of their comrades at every lull in the firing,’ wrote Lt. Colonel Charles H. Morgan.”
 
Regarding Union Position. This marker was replaced by a new one named Grant's Grand Assault (see nearby markers).
 
Also see . . .
1. Cold Harbor.
Earthworks at Cold Harbor image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
3. Earthworks at Cold Harbor
Union troops made several direct assaults on the entrenched Confederates at Cold Harbor between June 1 and 3, 1964. All were unsuccessful, and thousand of Union soldiers died on this ground.
CMSAC Battle Summaries webpage. (Submitted on January 4, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Cold Harbor. Richmond National Battlefield. (Submitted on January 4, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

3. Cold Harbor Battlefield Virtual Tour by Markers. This is one of the many markers along the walking trail, extended loop trail, and auto tour route in the Cold Harbor Battlefield Unit of the Richmond National Battlefield Park. (Submitted on March 9, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Richmond National Battlefield Park image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
4. Richmond National Battlefield Park
Marker is in the Cold Harbor Battlefield Unit of Richmond National Battlefield Park.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 703 times since then and 65 times this year. Last updated on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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