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Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Third Division

First Corps

 

—Army of the Potomac —

 
Third Division, First Corps Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, April 4, 2009
1. Third Division, First Corps Tablet
Note the circle or "moon" above the tablet, the symbol of First Corps.
Inscription.
Army of the Potomac
First Corps
Third Division

Brig. Gen. Thos. A. Rowley, Major Gen. Abner Doubleday

First Brigade Col. Chapman Biddle, Brig. Gen. T.A. Rowley
Second Brigade Col. Roy Stone, Col. Langhorne Wister, Col. E.L. Dana
Third Brigade Brig. Gen. Geo. J. Stannard, Col. Francis V. Randall

July 1. Arrived about 11 a.m. The First Brigade took position in the field on the left of Reynolds Woods. Second Brigade on Chambersburg Pike relieving Second Brigade First Division. These Brigades were actively engaged from 2 to 4 p.m. and retired with the Corps and took position south of the Cemetery fronting Emmitsburg Road. The Third Brigade joined at dusk.

July 2. At sunset sent to support of Third Corps on its right at Emmitsburg Road and captured 80 prisoners and recaptured 4 guns.

July 3. Position on left of Second Division Second Corps. Assisted in repulsing Longstreet's assault capturing many prisoners and three stand of colors.

Casualties Killed 13 officers 252 men. Wounded 89 officers 1208 men. Captured or missing 16 officers 525 men. Total 2103.
 
Erected 1912 by Gettysburg National Military Park Commission.
 
Location. 39° 50.041′ N, 77° 15.025′ 
Third Division Tablet to the East of McPherson Woods image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 1, 2008
2. Third Division Tablet to the East of McPherson Woods
W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is on Reynolds Avenue, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Located on the First Day Battlefield, opposite of McPherson Woods, in Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 8th New York Cavalry (within shouting distance of this marker); Major Gen. John F. Reynolds (within shouting distance of this marker); 151st Pennsylvania Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); Monuments and Markers (within shouting distance of this marker); The Battle Opens (within shouting distance of this marker); Battery L, 1st New York Light Artillery (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); First Brigade (about 400 feet away); Abner Doubleday (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. McPherson's Ridge. National Park Service virtual tour stop. (Submitted on January 12, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Reports of Maj. Gen. Abner Doubleday. General Doubleday, who was the division commander, was temporarily commanding the Corps when Gen. Reynolds was acting wing commander. General Rowley thus was the temporary commander of the division during the first day battle. Doubleday apparently
First Brigade, Third Division Line image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 1, 2008
3. First Brigade, Third Division Line
The First Brigade was deployed south of McPherson Woods, supporting the Iron Brigade (1st Brigade, 1st Division) in the woods.
thought well of Rowley:
General Rowley himself displayed great bravery. He was several times struck by spent shot and pieces of shell, and on the third day his horse was killed by a cannon-shot while he was holding him by the bridle and conversing with me. (Submitted on January 12, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Disgrace at Gettysburg. However, there is much more beyond the official report. Gens. Rowley and Cutler had a vicious verbal argument in the center of Gettysburg in the middle of the battle. Rowley was charged with drunkenness and insubordination and placed under arrest. Months after the battle, the court martial convened and found Rowley guilty. While later pardoned, he never again held a field command. (Submitted on January 12, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 791 times since then and 74 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2, 3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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